ameliorate

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 [əˈmiːljəreɪt]



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
a•mel•io•rate /əˈmilyəˌreɪt/USA pronunciation   v.,  -rat•ed, -rat•ing. 
  1. to make or become better or more satisfactory; improve: [+ object]Her apology ameliorated the situation.[no object]The situation ameliorated when both sides shook hands.
a•mel•io•ra•tion /əˌmilyəˈreɪʃən/USA pronunciation  n. [uncountable]

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
a•mel•io•rate  (ə mēlyə rāt′, ə mēlē ə-),USA pronunciation v.t., v.i.,  -rat•ed, -rat•ing. 
  1. to make or become better, more bearable, or more satisfactory; improve;
    meliorate.
a•melio•ra•ble, adj. 
a•melio•ra•ble•ness, n. 
a•melio•rant, n. 
a•melio•ra′tive,  a•mel•io•ra•to•ry  (ə mēlyə rāt′, ə mēlē ə-),USA pronunciation adj.  a•melio•ra′tor, n. 
  • a-5 + meliorate 1760–70
    amend, better. See  improve. 
    worsen.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

ameliorate /əˈmiːljəˌreɪt/ vb
  1. to make or become better; improve
Etymology: 18th Century: from meliorate, influenced by French améliorer to improve, from Old French ameillorer to make better, from meillor better, from Latin melior

aˈmeliorative adj aˈmelioˌrator n USAGE
Ameliorate is often wrongly used where alleviate is meant. Ameliorate is properly used to mean `improve', not `make easier to bear', so one should talk about alleviating pain or hardship, not ameliorating it




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