WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
bi•as /ˈbaɪəs/USA pronunciation   n., adj., v.,  -ased, -as•ing or (esp. Brit.) -assed, -as•sing. 
n. [countable]
  1. a tendency toward judging something without full knowledge of it;
    prejudice:He has a bias against anyone who is black.
  2. a particular tendency toward something:She has a natural bias for handwork and athletics.
  3. Textilesa slanting or diagonal line of direction, esp. across a woven fabric.

adj. [usually: before a noun]
  1. Textiles(of the cut of a fabric) diagonal;
    slanted.

v. [+ object]
  1. to influence unfairly:The lawyer made a tearful plea to bias the jury.
Idioms
  1. Idioms, Textiles on the bias,
    • in the diagonal direction of the cloth.
    • out of line;
      slanting.

    bias and prejudice both mean a strong and unfairly formed inclination of the mind oropinion about something or someone. A bias may be favorable or unfavorable: bias in favor of or against an idea. prejudice implies a judgment already formed and even more unreasoning than bias, and usually implies an unfavorable opinion: prejudice against a race.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
bi•as  (bīəs),USA pronunciation n., adj., adv., v.,  bi•ased, bi•as•ing  or (esp. Brit.) bi•assed, bi•as•sing. 
n. 
  1. Textilesan oblique or diagonal line of direction, esp. across a woven fabric.
  2. a particular tendency or inclination, esp. one that prevents unprejudiced consideration of a question;
    prejudice.
  3. Statisticsa systematic as opposed to a random distortion of a statistic as a result of sampling procedure.
  4. Sport[Lawn Bowling.]
    • a slight bulge or greater weight on one side of the ball or bowl.
    • the curved course made by such a ball when rolled.
  5. Electronicsthe application of a steady voltage or current to an active device, as a diode or transistor, to produce a desired mode of operation.
  6. Sound Reproductiona high-frequency alternating current applied to the recording head of a tape recorder during recording in order to reduce distortion.
  7. Idioms, Textileson the bias: 
    • in the diagonal direction of the cloth.
    • out of line;
      slanting.

adj. 
  1. Textilescut, set, folded, etc., diagonally:This material requires a bias cut.

adv. 
  1. in a diagonal manner;
    obliquely;
    slantingly:to cut material bias.

v.t. 
  1. to cause partiality or favoritism in (a person);
    influence, esp. unfairly:a tearful plea designed to bias the jury.
  2. Electronicsto apply a steady voltage or current to (the input of an active device).
  • Greek epikársios oblique, equivalent. to epi- epi- + -karsios oblique
  • Vulgar Latin *(e)bigassius
  • Old Provencal, probably
  • Middle French biais oblique
  • 1520–30
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged predisposition, preconception, predilection, partiality, proclivity;
      bent, leaning.
      Bias, prejudice mean a strong inclination of the mind or a preconceived opinion about something or someone. A
      bias may be favorable or unfavorable:bias in favor of or against an idea.Prejudice implies a preformed judgment even more unreasoning than
      bias, and usually implies an unfavorable opinion:prejudice against a race.
    • 10.See corresponding entry in Unabridged predispose, bend, incline, dispose.
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged impartiality.

Bi•as  (bīəs),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Biographicalfl. 570 b.c., Greek philosopher, born in Ionia.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

bias /ˈbaɪəs/ n
  1. mental tendency or inclination, esp an irrational preference or prejudice
  2. a diagonal line or cut across the weave of a fabric
  3. the voltage applied to an electronic device or system to establish suitable working conditions
  4. a bulge or weight inside one side of a bowl
  5. the curved course of such a bowl on the green
  6. an extraneous latent influence on, unrecognized conflated variable in, or selectivity in a sample which influences its distribution and so renders it unable to reflect the desired population parameters
adv
  1. obliquely; diagonally
vb ( -ases, -asing, -ased, -asses, -assing, -assed)(transitive)
  1. (usually passive) to cause to have a bias; prejudice; influence
Etymology: 16th Century: from Old French biais, from Old Provençal, perhaps ultimately from Greek epikarsios oblique

ˈbiased, ˈbiassed adj



'bias' also found in these entries:
Collocations: bias [the jury, public opinion], [winners, exposure, selection, media, unconscious] bias, bias them towards [men, whites], more...

Forum discussions with the word(s) "bias" in the title:


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