WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
-blood•ed /ˈblʌdɪd/USA pronunciation   combining form. 
  1. The combining form -blooded is used after words to make adjectives that mean "having the blood of a (specified) kind'':warm-blooded animals (= animals that have warm blood, blood that does not change temperature).

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
blood•ed  (bludid),USA pronunciation adj. 
  1. having blood of a specified kind (used in combination):warm-blooded animals.
  2. Animal Husbandry(of horses, cattle, etc.) derived from ancestors of good blood;
    having a good pedigree.
  • 1200–50; Middle English; see blood, -ed3

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
blood /blʌd/USA pronunciation   n. 
  1. Anatomy[uncountable] the red fluid that flows through the heart throughout the body.
  2. Zoology[uncountable] a similar fluid in other animals.
  3. something regarded as a source of energy or new life:[uncountable]The company needs new blood.
  4. bloodshed;
    slaughter:[uncountable]the blood of the battlefield.
  5. temperament;
    passion;
    emotion:[uncountable]a person of hot blood.
  6. relationship by family:[uncountable]They are related by blood.
Idioms
  1. Idioms bad blood, deep, long-lasting hatred:bad blood between the two families for decades.
  2. Idioms get or have one's blood up, to become or be enraged, emotional, etc.: Injustice of any sort always gets my blood up.
  3. Idioms in cold blood, with complete lack of feeling or mercy:shot the two young children in cold blood.
  4. Idioms make one's blood boil, to cause feelings of resentment, anger, or indignation: Such carelessness makes my blood boil.
  5. Idiomsmake one's blood run cold, to fill with great fear or terror: The dark, deserted street made her blood run cold.


WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
blood  (blud),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. the fluid that circulates in the principal vascular system of human beings and other vertebrates, in humans consisting of plasma in which the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets are suspended.
  2. the vital principle;
    life:The excitement had got into the very blood of the nation.
  3. a person or group regarded as a source of energy, vitality, or vigor:It's time we got some new blood in this company.
  4. Physiologyone of the four elemental bodily humors of medieval physiology, regarded as causing cheerfulness.
  5. bloodshed;
    gore;
    slaughter;
    murder:to avenge the blood of his father.
  6. the juice or sap of plants:the blood of the grape.
  7. temperament;
    state of mind:a person of hot blood.
  8. physical nature of human beings:the frailty of our blood.
  9. [Chiefly Brit.]a high-spirited dandy;
    an adventuresome youth:the young bloods of Cambridge.
  10. a profligate or rake.
  11. physical and cultural extraction:It was a trait that seemed to be in their blood.
  12. royal extraction:a prince of the blood.
  13. descent from a common ancestor;
    ancestry;
    lineage:related by blood.
  14. recorded and respected ancestry;
    purebred breeding.
  15. [Slang.]a black person, esp. a man.
  16. get or  have one's blood up, to become or be enraged or impassioned:Injustice of any sort always gets my blood up.
  17. have someone's blood on one's head or  hands, to be to blame for someone's affliction or death:Though a criminal, he had no blood on his hands.
  18. in cold blood, deliberately;
    ruthlessly:The dictator, in cold blood, ordered the execution of all his political enemies.
  19. make one's blood boil, to inspire resentment, anger, or indignation:Such carelessness makes my blood boil.
  20. make one's blood run  cold, to fill with terror;
    frighten:The dark, deserted street in that unfamiliar neighborhood made her blood run cold.
  21. sweat blood. See  sweat (def. 24).
  22. taste blood, to experience a new sensation, usually a violent or destructive one, and acquire an appetite for it:Once the team had tasted blood, there was no preventing them from winning by a wide margin.

v.t. 
  1. [Hunting.]to give (hounds) a first sight or taste of blood. Cf. flesh (def. 17).
  2. to stain with blood.
bloodlike′, adj. 
  • Gmc * blōdan, an old neuter adjective, adjectival meaning "spurting'' that accompanied the lost Indo-European noun *HesHr (Hittite eshar) blood; akin to bloom1; for the meaning compare spurt and sprout
  • bef. 1000; Middle English blo(o)d, Old English blōd; cognate with Old Frisian, Old Saxon blōd, Old High German bluot (German Blut), Old Norse blōth, Gothic bloth
    • 13.See corresponding entry in Unabridged kinship, stock, family.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

blooded /ˈblʌdɪd/ adj
  1. (of horses, cattle, etc) of good breeding
  2. (in combination) having blood or temperament as specified: hot-blooded, cold-blooded, warm-blooded, red-blooded, blue-blooded



blood /blʌd/ n
  1. a reddish fluid in vertebrates that is pumped by the heart through the arteries and veins, supplies tissues with nutrients, oxygen, etc, and removes waste products. It consists of a fluid (see blood plasma) containing cells (erythrocytes, leucocytes, and platelets)
  2. a similar fluid in such invertebrates as annelids and arthropods
  3. bloodshed, esp when resulting in murder
  4. life itself; lifeblood
  5. relationship through being of the same family, race, or kind; kinship
  6. flesh and bloodnear kindred or kinship, esp that between a parent and child
  7. human nature (esp in the phrase it's more than flesh and blood can stand)
  8. in one's bloodas a natural or inherited characteristic or talent
  9. the bloodroyal or noble descent: a prince of the blood
  10. temperament; disposition; temper
  11. good or pure breeding; pedigree
  12. (as modifier): blood horses
  13. people viewed as members of a group, esp as an invigorating force (in the phrases new blood, young blood)
  14. chiefly Brit rare a dashing young man; dandy; rake
  15. in cold bloodshowing no passion; deliberately; ruthlessly
  16. make one's blood boilto cause to be angry or indignant
  17. make one's blood run coldto fill with horror
vb (transitive)
  1. to cause (young hounds) to taste the blood of a freshly killed quarry and so become keen to hunt
Etymology: Old English blōd; related to Old Norse blōth, Old High German bluot



'blooded' also found in these entries:
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