WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
bloo•mers1 /ˈblumɚz/USA pronunciation   n. [plural]
  1. Clothing
    • loose trousers gathered at the knee, formerly worn by women for gymnastics or sports.
    • women's underpants of similar, but less bulky, design.

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
bloo•mer /ˈblumɚ/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Botanya plant that blooms: a night bloomer.
  2. a person who develops skills to the fullest capacity:She was a late bloomer.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
bloo•mer1  (blo̅o̅mər),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Clothinga costume for women, advocated about 1850 by Amelia Jenks Bloomer, consisting of a short skirt, loose trousers gathered and buttoned at the ankle, and often a coat and a wide hat.
  2. Clothingbloomers, (used with a pl. v.)
    • loose trousers gathered at the knee, formerly worn by women as part of a gymnasium, riding, or other sports outfit.
    • women's underpants of similar, but less bulky, design.
    • the trousers of a bloomer costume.
    • any of various women's garments with full-cut legs gathered at the bottom edge.

adj. 
  1. Clothing(of a woman's garment) having full-cut legs gathered at the bottom edge:bloomer shorts.
  • named after A.J. Bloomer 1850–55, American.

bloom•er2  (blo̅o̅mər),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Botanya plant that blooms:a night bloomer.
  2. a person who develops skills, abilities, interests, etc., commensurate with his or her capacities:a quiet, methodical child who became a late bloomer.
  • bloom1 + -er1 1720–30

bloom•er3  (blo̅o̅mər),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. British Termsa foolish mistake;
    blunder.
  • bloom(ing) (as euphemism for bloody) + -er1 1885–90

Bloo•mer  (blo̅o̅mər),USA pronunciation n. 
    Amelia Jenks  ( jengks),USA pronunciation 1818–94, U.S. social reformer and women's-rights leader.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

bloomers /ˈbluːməz/ pl n
  1. informal women's or girls' baggy knickers
  2. (formerly) loose trousers gathered at the knee worn by women for cycling and athletics
Etymology: from bloomer, a garment introduced in about 1850 and publicized by Mrs A. Bloomer (1818–94), US social reformer



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