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card sharp


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WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2018
card1 /kɑrd/USA pronunciation   n. 
  1. a usually rectangular piece of stiff paper used to record information, etc:[countable]She showed her identification card and was let in.
  2. Games[countable] one of a set of cards with spots, etc., used in playing various games.
  3. Gamescards, (noncount;
    used with a singular verb
    )
    • a game or games played with such a set.
  4. something useful in attaining an objective, likened to a high card in a game:[countable]I had one more card to play: my friendship with the president.
  5. [countable] a folded piece of thin cardboard printed with a message of holiday greeting, etc.
  6. postcard.
  7. Informal Terms
    • an amusing or prankish person.
Idioms
  1. Idiomsin the cards, destined or certain to occur.
  2. Idiomsput or lay one's cards on the table, to be completely straightforward;
    conceal nothing.


card2 /kɑrd/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]Also called card•ing ma•chine /ˈkɑrdɪŋ məˌʃin/USA pronunciation  
  1. Textilesa machine for combing fibers, as of cotton or wool, before spinning.

v. [ + obj]
  1. Textilesto comb (fibers) with this machine.
card•er, n. [countable]

Card.,  an abbreviation of:
  1. ReligionCardinal.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2018
card1  (kärd),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. a usually rectangular piece of stiff paper, thin pasteboard, or plastic for various uses, as to write information on or printed as a means of identifying the holder:a 3ʺ × 5ʺ file card; a membership card.
  2. Gamesone of a set of thin pieces of cardboard with spots, figures, etc., used in playing various games;
    playing card.
  3. Gamescards, (usually used with a sing. v.)
    • a game or games played with such a set.
    • the playing of such a game:to win at cards.
    • Casino. the winning of 27 cards or more.
    • [Whist.]tricks won in excess of six.
  4. Also called  greeting card. a piece of paper or thin cardboard, usually folded, printed with a message of holiday greeting, congratulations, or other sentiment, often with an illustration or decorations, for mailing to a person on an appropriate occasion.
  5. something useful in attaining an objective, as a course of action or position of strength, comparable to a high card held in a game:If negotiation fails, we still have another card to play.
  6. postcard.
  7. See  calling card (def. 1).
  8. Business[Com.]
    • See  credit card. 
    • See  bank card. 
  9. Sporta program of the events at races, boxing matches, etc.
  10. Sportscorecard.
  11. a menu or wine list.
  12. See  compass card. 
  13. Computing
    • See  punch card. 
    • board (def. 14a).
  14. See  trading card. 
  15. Informal Terms
    • a person who is amusing or facetious.
    • any person, esp. one with some indicated characteristic:a queer card.
  16. Idiomsin or  on the cards, impending or likely;
    probable:A reorganization is in the cards.
  17. Idiomsplay one's cards right, to act cleverly, sensibly, or cautiously:If you play your cards right, you may get mentioned in her will.
  18. Idiomsput one's cards on the table, to be completely straightforward and open;
    conceal nothing:He always believed in putting his cards on the table.

v.t. 
  1. to provide with a card.
  2. to fasten on a card.
  3. to write, list, etc., on cards.
  4. Slang Termsto examine the identity card or papers of:The bartender was carding all youthful customers to be sure they were of legal drinking age.
  • Middle English carde, unexplained variant of carte 1350–1400

card2  (kärd),USA pronunciation n. Also called carding machine. 
  1. Textilesa machine for combing and paralleling fibers of cotton, flax, wool, etc., prior to spinning to remove short, undesirable fibers and produce a sliver.
  2. Textilesa similar implement for raising the nap on cloth.

v.t. 
  1. Textilesto dress (wool or the like) with a card.
  2. card out, [Print.]to add extra space between lines of text, so as to fill out a page or column or give the text a better appearance.
carder, n. 
  • Late Latin cardus thistle, variant of Latin carduus
  • Middle French: literally, teasel head
  • Middle English carde 1325–75

Card., 
  • ReligionCardinal.


  • Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

    card /kɑːd/ n
    1. a piece of stiff paper or thin cardboard, usually rectangular, with varied uses, as for filing information in an index, bearing a written notice for display, entering scores in a game, etc
    2. such a card used for identification, reference, proof of membership, etc: library card, identity card, visiting card
    3. such a card used for sending greetings, messages, or invitations, often bearing an illustration, printed greetings, etc: Christmas card, birthday card
    4. one of a set of small pieces of cardboard, variously marked with significant figures, symbols, etc, used for playing games or for fortune-telling
    5. short for playing card
    6. (as modifier): a card game
    7. informal a witty, entertaining, or eccentric person
    8. short for cheque card, credit card
    9. See compass card
    10. Also called: race card a daily programme of all the races at a meeting, listing the runners, riders, weights to be carried, distances to be run, and conditions of each race
    11. a thing or action used in order to gain an advantage, esp one that is concealed and kept in reserve until needed (esp in the phrase a card up one's sleeve)

    See also cardsEtymology: 15th Century: from Old French carte, from Latin charta leaf of papyrus, from Greek khartēs, probably of Egyptian origin
    card /kɑːd/ vb
    1. (transitive) to comb out and clean fibres of wool or cotton before spinning
    n
    1. (formerly) a machine or comblike tool for carding fabrics or for raising the nap on cloth
    Etymology: 15th Century: from Old French carde card, teasel, from Latin carduus thistle

    ˈcarding n ˈcarder n



    'card sharp' also found in these entries:
    Collocations: is a card sharp, makes [an earning, a living] as a card sharp, is a [cheating, no good, charismatic] card sharp, more...

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