catch hold of

We could not find the full phrase you were looking for.
The entry for 'catch' is displayed below.

Also see: hold | of


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

catch /kætʃ/ vb (catches, catching, caught)
  1. (transitive) to take hold of so as to retain or restrain
  2. (transitive) to take, seize, or capture, esp after pursuit
  3. (transitive) to ensnare or deceive, as by trickery
  4. (transitive) to surprise or detect in an act: he caught the dog rifling the larder
  5. (transitive) to reach with a blow: the stone caught him on the side of the head
  6. (transitive) to overtake or reach in time to board
  7. (transitive) to see or hear; attend
  8. (transitive) to be infected with: to catch a cold
  9. to hook or entangle or become hooked or entangled
  10. to fasten or be fastened with or as if with a latch or other device
  11. (transitive) to attract or arrest: she tried to catch his eye
  12. (transitive) to comprehend: I didn't catch his meaning
  13. (transitive) to hear accurately: I didn't catch what you said
  14. (transitive) to captivate or charm
  15. (transitive) to perceive and reproduce accurately: the painter managed to catch his model's beauty
  16. (transitive) to hold back or restrain: he caught his breath in surprise
  17. (intransitive) to become alight: the fire won't catch
  18. (transitive) to dismiss (a batsman) by intercepting and holding a ball struck by him before it touches the ground
  19. (intransitive) often followed by at: to grasp or attempt to grasp
  20. to take advantage (of), esp eagerly: he caught at the chance
  21. catch itinformal to be scolded or reprimanded
n
  1. the act of catching or grasping
  2. a device that catches and fastens, such as a latch
  3. anything that is caught, esp something worth catching
  4. the amount or number caught
  5. informal a person regarded as an eligible matrimonial prospect
  6. a check or break in the voice
  7. a break in a mechanism
  8. informal a concealed, unexpected, or unforeseen drawback or handicap
  9. (as modifier): a catch question
  10. the catching of a ball struck by a batsman before it touches the ground, resulting in him being out
  11. a type of round popular in the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, having a humorous text that is often indecent or bawdy and hard to articulate

See also catch on, catch out, catch upEtymology: 13th Century cacchen to pursue, from Old Northern French cachier, from Latin captāre to snatch, from capere to seize

ˈcatchable adj



Download free Android and iPhone apps

Android AppiPhone App
Report an inappropriate ad.