WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2014
clock1 /klɑk/USA pronunciation  n. [countable]
  1. a relatively large instrument for telling time.
  2. time clock.
  3. a meter for measuring and recording speed, etc.:The skier is racing against the clock.
  4. biological clock.

v. 
  1. [+ object] to time, test, or determine by means of a clock or watch:The racehorse was clocked at two minutes thirty seconds.
  2. clock in (or out), [no object] to begin (or end) the day's work, esp. by punching a time clock:What time did you clock in today?
idiom
  1. around the clock, [uncountable]
    • for the entire 24-hour day without pause:The factory shifts worked around the clock.
    • without stopping for rest; tirelessly:working at this project around the clock.



Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

clock /klɒk/ n
  1. a timepiece, usually free-standing, hanging, or built into a tower, having mechanically or electrically driven pointers that move constantly over a dial showing the numbers of the hours
  2. any clocklike device for recording or measuring, such as a taximeter or pressure gauge
  3. the downy head of a dandelion that has gone to seed
  4. short for time clock
  5. around the clock, round the clockall day and all night
  6. the clock
    an informal word for speedometer, mileometer
  7. Brit
    a slang word for face
vb
  1. (transitive) Brit Austral NZ slang to strike, esp on the face or head
  2. (transitive) to record time as with a stopwatch, esp in the calculation of speed
Etymology: 14th Century: from Middle Dutch clocke clock, from Medieval Latin clocca bell, ultimately of Celtic origin
clock /klɒk/ n
  1. an ornamental design either woven in or embroidered on the side of a stocking
Etymology: 16th Century: from Middle Dutch clocke, from Medieval Latin clocca bell



'clock' also found in these entries:
In the English description:

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