clock

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 /klɒk/



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2015
clock1 /klɑk/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Timea relatively large instrument for telling time.
  2. time clock.
  3. a meter for measuring and recording speed, etc.:The skier is racing against the clock.
  4. Biologybiological clock.

v. 
  • [+ object] to time, test, or determine by means of a clock or watch:The racehorse was clocked at two minutes thirty seconds.
  • clock in (or out), [no object] to begin (or end) the day's work, esp. by punching a time clock:What time did you clock in today?
  • idiom
      around the clock, [uncountable]
      • for the entire 24-hour day without pause:The factory shifts worked around the clock.
      • without stopping for rest; tirelessly:working at this project around the clock.


    WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2015
    clock1  (klok), 
    n. 
    1. Timean instrument for measuring and recording time, esp. by mechanical means, usually with hands or changing numbers to indicate the hour and minute: not designed to be worn or carried about.
    2. See time clock. 
    3. a meter or other device, as a speedometer or taximeter, for measuring and recording speed, distance covered, or other quantitative functioning.
    4. BiologySee biological clock. 
    5. (cap.)[Astron.]the constellation Horologium.
    6. Computing[Computers.]the circuit in a digital computer that provides a common reference train of electronic pulses for all other circuits.
    7. around the clock: 
      • during all 24 hours;
        ceaselessly.
      • without stopping for rest;
        tirelessly:working around the clock to stem the epidemic.
    8. Idiomsclean (someone's) clock, to defeat; vanquish.
    9. Sportkill the clock, [Sports.]to use up as much game time as possible when one is winning, as to protect a lead in basketball, ice hockey, or football. Also,run out the clock. 
    10. Idiomsstop the clock, to postpone an official or legal deadline by ceasing to count the hours that elapse, as when a new union contract must be agreed upon before an old contract runs out.

    v.t. 
  • to time, test, or determine by means of a clock or watch:The racehorse was clocked at two minutes thirty seconds.
  • Slang Terms[Slang.]to strike sharply or heavily:Somebody clocked him on the face.

  • v.i. 
  • clock in, to begin work, esp. by punching a time clock:She clocked in at 9 on the dot.
  • clock out, to end work, esp. by punching a time clock:He clocked out early yesterday.
  • Etymology:
    • Middle Dutch clocke bell, clock; akin to Old English clucge, Old High German glocka (German Glocke), Old Irish clocc bell; compare cloak
    • Middle English clok(ke) 1350–1400

    clock2  (klok), 
    n. 
    1. a short embroidered or woven ornament on each side or on the outer side of a sock or stocking, extending from the ankle upward.

    v.t. 
  • to embroider with such an ornament.
  • Etymology:
    • origin, originally uncertain 1520–30


    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

    clock /klɒk/ n
    1. a timepiece, usually free-standing, hanging, or built into a tower, having mechanically or electrically driven pointers that move constantly over a dial showing the numbers of the hours
    2. any clocklike device for recording or measuring, such as a taximeter or pressure gauge
    3. the downy head of a dandelion that has gone to seed
    4. short for time clock
    5. around the clock, round the clockall day and all night
    6. the clock
      an informal word for speedometer, mileometer
    7. Brit
      a slang word for face
    vb
    1. (transitive) Brit Austral NZ slang to strike, esp on the face or head
    2. (transitive) to record time as with a stopwatch, esp in the calculation of speed
    Etymology: 14th Century: from Middle Dutch clocke clock, from Medieval Latin clocca bell, ultimately of Celtic origin
    clock /klɒk/ n
    1. an ornamental design either woven in or embroidered on the side of a stocking
    Etymology: 16th Century: from Middle Dutch clocke, from Medieval Latin clocca bell



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