WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
com•bat /v. kəmˈbæt, ˈkɑmbæt; n. ˈkɑmbæt/USA pronunciation   v.,  -bat•ed, -bat•ing or (esp. Brit.) -bat•ted, -bat•ting, n. 
v. 
  1. to fight or contend against;
    oppose vigorously: [+ object]to combat crime.[+ object + with + object]to combat disease with antibiotics.

n. 
  1. Military armed fighting with enemy forces:[uncountable]The day of combat had arrived for the men of Squadron 1.
  2. a struggle or contest, as between two persons, teams, or ideas:[countable]in a combat for first place.
See -bat-.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
com•bat  (v. kəm bat, kombat, kum-;n. kombat, kum-),USA pronunciation v.,  -bat•ed, -bat•ing  or (esp. Brit.) -bat•ted, -bat•ting, n. 
v.t. 
  1. to fight or contend against;
    oppose vigorously:to combat crime.

v.i. 
  1. to battle;
    contend:to combat with disease.

n. 
  1. Militaryactive, armed fighting with enemy forces.
  2. a fight, struggle, or controversy, as between two persons, teams, or ideas.
com•bata•ble, adj. 
  • Late Latin combattere, equivalent. to Latin com- com- + Late Latin battere, for Latin battuere to strike, beat
  • Middle French combat (noun, nominal), combattre (verb, verbal)
  • 1535–45
    • 1, 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged struggle, contest.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

combat n /ˈkɒmbæt; -bət; ˈkʌm-/
  1. a fight, conflict, or struggle
  2. an action fought between two military forces
  3. (as modifier): a combat jacket
  4. single combata fight between two individuals; duel
vb /kəmˈbæt; ˈkɒmbæt; ˈkʌm-/ ( -bats, -bating, -bated)
  1. (transitive) to fight or defy
  2. (intr; often followed by with or against) to struggle or strive (against); be in conflict (with): to combat against disease
Etymology: 16th Century: from French, from Old French combattre, from Vulgar Latin combattere (unattested), from Latin com- with + battuere to beat, hit



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