WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
com•pound1 /adj., v. ˈkɑmpaʊnd, kəmˈpaʊnd; n. ˈkɑmpaʊnd/USA pronunciation   adj. [before a noun]
  1. composed of two or more ingredients: Bronze is a compound metal made of copper and tin.
  2. having or involving two or more actions or functions: The mouth is a compound organ.
  3. Grammar(of a word)
    • Grammarmade up of two or more parts that are also words, as housetop, many-sided, playact, or upon.
    • made up of two or more parts that are also bases, as biochemistry or ethnography.
  4. Grammar(of a verb tense) made up of an auxiliary verb and a main verb, as are swimming, have spoken, or will write(opposed to simple ).

n. [countable]
  1. something formed by compounding or combining parts, elements, etc.:Water is a compound of hydrogen and oxygen.
  2. Grammara compound word, esp. one composed of two or more words, as moonflower or rainstorm.

v. [+ object]
  1. to put together into a whole;
    combine: to compound drugs to form a new medicine.
  2. to make or form by combining parts;
    construct: The medicine was compounded from various drugs.
  3. to increase or add to, esp. so as to worsen:When he started arguing with the police officer it only compounded his problems.
  4. Businessto pay (interest) on the interest already earned as well as on the principal:The bank compounds interest on a savings account.
com•pound•a•ble, adj. 
com•pound•er, n. [countable]See -pound-.

com•pound2 /ˈkɑmpaʊnd/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. a separate area, usually fenced or walled, containing barracks or other structures.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
com•pound1  (adj. kompound, kom pound;n. kompound;
v. kəm pound, kompound),USA pronunciation
 adj. 
  1. composed of two or more parts, elements, or ingredients:Soap is a compound substance.
  2. having or involving two or more actions or functions:The mouth is a compound organ.
  3. Grammarof or pertaining to a compound sentence or compound-complex sentence.
  4. Grammar(of a word)
    • consisting of two or more parts that are also bases, as housetop, many-sided, playact, or upon.
    • consisting of any two or more parts that have identifiable meaning, as a base and a noninflectional affix (return, follower), a base and a combining form (biochemistry), two combining forms (ethnography), or a combining form and a noninflectional affix (aviary, dentoid).
  5. Grammar(of a verb tense) consisting of an auxiliary verb and a main verb, as are swimming, have spoken, or will write (opposed to simple).
  6. Botanycomposed of several similar parts that combine to form a whole:a compound fruit.
  7. [Zool.]composed of a number of distinct individuals that are connected to form a united whole or colony, as coral.
  8. [Music.]of or pertaining to compound time.
  9. Mechanical Engineering[Mach.]noting an engine or turbine expanding the same steam or the like in two successive chambers to do work at two ranges of pressure.

n. 
  1. something formed by compounding or combining parts, elements, etc.
  2. Chemistrya pure substance composed of two or more elements whose composition is constant.
  3. Grammara compound word, esp. one composed of two or more words that are otherwise unaltered, as moonflower or rainstorm.

v.t. 
  1. to put together into a whole;
    combine:to compound drugs to form a new medicine.
  2. to make or form by combining parts, elements, etc.;
    construct:to compound a new plan from parts of several former plans.
  3. to make up or constitute:all the organs and members that compound a human body.
  4. to settle or adjust by agreement, esp. for a reduced amount, as a debt.
  5. Lawto agree, for a consideration, not to prosecute or punish a wrongdoer for:to compound a crime or felony.
  6. Businessto pay (interest) on the accrued interest as well as the principal:My bank compounds interest quarterly.
  7. to increase or add to:The misery of his loneliness was now compounded by his poverty.
  8. Electricityto connect a portion of the field turns of (a direct-current dynamo) in series with the armature circuit.

v.i. 
  1. to make a bargain;
    come to terms;
    compromise.
  2. Businessto settle a debt, claim, etc., by compromise.
  3. to form a compound.
com•pounda•ble, adj. 
com•pounded•ness, n. 
com•pounder, n. 
  • Latin compōnere, equivalent. to com- com- + pōnere to put; (adjective, adjectival) Middle English compouned, past participle of compounen, as above
  • Middle French compon- (stem of compondre)
  • (verb, verbal) Middle English compounen 1350–1400

com•pound2  (kompound),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. (in the Far East) an enclosure containing residences, business offices, or other establishments of Europeans.
  2. (in Africa) a similar enclosure for native laborers.
  3. any enclosure, esp. for prisoners of war.
  4. any separate cluster of homes, often owned by members of the same family.
  • 1670–80; alteration, by association with compound1, of Malay kampung village, collection, gathering; compare kampong


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

compound n /ˈkɒmpaʊnd/
  1. a substance that contains atoms of two or more chemical elements held together by chemical bonds
  2. any combination of two or more parts, aspects, etc
  3. a word formed from two existing words or combining forms
vb /kəmˈpaʊnd/(mainly tr)
  1. to mix or combine so as to create a compound or other product
  2. to make by combining parts, elements, aspects, etc: to compound a new plastic
  3. to intensify by an added element: his anxiety was compounded by her crying
  4. (also intr) to come to an agreement in (a quarrel, dispute, etc)
  5. (also intr) to settle (a debt, promise, etc) for less than what is owed; compromise
  6. to agree not to prosecute in return for a consideration: to compound a crime
adj /ˈkɒmpaʊnd/
  1. composed of or created by the combination of two or more parts, elements, etc
  2. (of a word) consisting of elements that are also words or productive combining forms
  3. (of a verb or the tense, mood, etc, of a verb) formed by using an auxiliary verb in addition to the main verb
  4. denoting a time in which the number of beats per bar is a multiple of three: six-four is an example of compound time
  5. (of an interval) greater than an octave
  6. (of a steam engine, turbine, etc) having multiple stages in which the steam or working fluid from one stage is used in a subsequent stage
  7. (of a piston engine) having a turbocharger powered by a turbine in the exhaust stream
Etymology: 14th Century: from earlier compounen, from Old French compondre to collect, set in order, from Latin compōnere

comˈpoundable adj
compound /ˈkɒmpaʊnd/ n
  1. (esp formerly in South Africa) an enclosure, esp on the mines, containing the living quarters for Black workers
  2. any similar enclosure, such as a camp for prisoners of war
Etymology: 17th Century: by folk etymology (influenced by compound1) from Malay kampong village



'compound' also found in these entries:
Collocations: compound the [interest, earnings], a [molecular, chemical, rubber, metal] compound, a compound [form, noun, word], more...

Forum discussions with the word(s) "compound" in the title:


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