WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
crowd1 /kraʊd/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. a large number of people gathered together;
    throng:The crowd broke up and people went on their way.
  2. any group having something in common, or sharing the same interests:the theater crowd.
  3. a group of spectators;
    audience:the opening night crowd.

v. 
  1. to gather in large numbers;
    throng:[no object]They crowded around to watch the police give first aid.
  2. to press closely together;
    squeeze into a small space;
    cram: [no object]The reporters crowded close to the president.[+ object]The police crowded us back into the street.
  3. to fill, such as by pressing or thronging into:[+ object]The partygoers crowded the streets.
  4. to put or place under constant pressure:[+ object]They were crowding me, asking for a decision I wasn't ready to give.
    crowd, multitude, swarm, throng refer to large numbers of people. crowd suggests a moving, pushing, uncomfortable, and possibly disorderly company: A crowd gathered to listen to the speech. multitude emphasizes the great number of persons or things but suggests that there is space enough for all: a multitude of people at the market on Saturdays. swarm, when it is used of people, is usually contemptuous, suggesting a moving, restless, often noisy, crowd: A swarm of dirty children played in the street. throng suggests a company that presses together or forward, often with some common aim: The throng pushed forward to see the cause of the excitement.
    See collective noun.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
crowd1  (kroud),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. a large number of persons gathered closely together;
    throng:a crowd of angry people.
  2. any large number of persons.
  3. any group or set of persons with something in common:The restaurant attracts a theater crowd.
  4. audience;
    attendance:Opening night drew a good crowd.
  5. the common people;
    the masses:He feels superior to the crowd.
  6. a large number of things gathered or considered together.
  7. Sociologya temporary gathering of people responding to common stimuli and engaged in any of various forms of collective behavior.

v.i. 
  1. to gather in large numbers;
    throng;
    swarm.
  2. to press forward;
    advance by pushing.

v.t. 
  1. to press closely together;
    force into a confined space;
    cram:to crowd clothes into a suitcase.
  2. to push;
    shove.
  3. to fill to excess;
    fill by pressing or thronging into.
  4. to place under pressure or stress by constant solicitation:to crowd a debtor for payment; to crowd someone with embarrassing questions.
  5. Nauticalcrowd on sail, to carry a press of sail.
crowder, n. 
  • bef. 950; Middle English crowden, Old English crūden to press, hurry; cognate with Middle Dutch crūden to push (Dutch kruien)
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged Crowd, multitude, swarm, throng refer to large numbers of people.
      Crowd suggests a jostling, uncomfortable, and possibly disorderly company:A crowd gathered to listen to the speech.Multitude emphasizes the great number of persons or things but suggests that there is space enough for all:a multitude of people at the market on Saturdays.Swarm as used of people is usually contemptuous, suggesting a moving, restless, often noisy, crowd:A swarm of dirty children played in the street.Throng suggests a company that presses together or forward, often with some common aim:The throng pushed forward to see the cause of the excitement.
    • 5.See corresponding entry in Unabridged proletariat, plebeians, populace.
    • 8.See corresponding entry in Unabridged assemble, herd.
    See  collective noun. 

crowd2  (kroud),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Music and Dancean ancient Celtic musical instrument with the strings stretched over a rectangular frame, played with a bow.
Also,  crwth. 
  • Welsh crwth crwth
  • Middle English crowd(e), variant of crouth 1275–1325


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

crowd /kraʊd/ n
  1. a large number of things or people gathered or considered together
  2. a particular group of people, esp considered as a social or business set: the crowd from the office
  3. the crowdthe common people; the masses
vb
  1. (intransitive) to gather together in large numbers; throng
  2. (transitive) to press together into a confined space
  3. (transitive) to fill to excess; fill by pushing into
  4. (transitive) informal to urge or harass by urging
Etymology: Old English crūdan; related to Middle Low German krūden to molest, Middle Dutch crūden to push, Norwegian kryda to swarm

ˈcrowded adj ˈcrowdedness n



'crowd' also found in these entries:
Collocations: crowded the [room, stadium, auditorium], an [angry, upset] crowd, was a real crowd pleaser, more...

Forum discussions with the word(s) "crowd" in the title:


Look up "crowd" at Merriam-Webster
Look up "crowd" at dictionary.com

In other languages: Spanish | French | Italian | Portuguese | Romanian | German | Dutch | Swedish | Russian | Polish | Czech | Greek | Turkish | Chinese | Japanese | Korean | Arabic

Advertisements

Word of the day: spare | scale

Advertisements

Report an inappropriate ad.
Become a WordReference Supporter to view the site ad-free.