WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
dash•er  (dashər),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. a person or thing that dashes.
  2. Fooda kind of plunger with paddles at one end, for stirring and mixing liquids or semisolids in a churn, ice-cream freezer, or the like.
  3. a person of dashing appearance or manner.
  • dash1 + -er1 1780–90

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
dash1 /dæʃ/USA pronunciation   v. 
  1. to (cause to) strike or smash violently, esp. so as to break to pieces: [ + obj]:The waves dashed the boat to pieces.[no obj]:The waves dashed against the shore.
  2. [ + obj] to throw violently or suddenly:dashed a plate against a wall in a fit of rage.
  3. [ + obj] to apply roughly, as by splashing;
    splatter:to dash paint on a wall.
  4. [ + obj] to ruin, destroy, or frustrate:The rain dashed our hopes for a picnic.
  5. [no obj] to move with great speed;
    rush:to dash around the corner.
  6. dash off: 
    • [no obj] to hurry away;
      leave:She dashed off before I could talk to her.
    • Also,  dash down. to write, make, accomplish, etc., too quickly or hastily: [ + off + obj ] :to dash off a letter.[ + obj + off ] :to dash it off in a hurry.

n. [countable]
  1. a small quantity of anything mixed with something else:a dash of salt.
  2. a hasty or sudden movement;
    a rush:to make a mad dash for the door.
  3. Sporta short race:the 100-yard dash.
  4. a mark or sign (), used variously in printed or written matter, esp. to note a break, pause, or hesitation, and to separate elements of a sentence or series of sentences, such as a question from its answer.
dash•er, n. [countable]

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
dash1  (dash),USA pronunciation v.t. 
  1. to strike or smash violently, esp. so as to break to pieces:He dashed the plate into smithereens against the wall.
  2. to throw or thrust violently or suddenly:to dash one stone against another.
  3. to splash, often violently;
    bespatter (with water, mud, etc.):He recovered consciousness when they dashed water in his face.
  4. to apply roughly, as by splashing:to dash paint here and there on the wall.
  5. to mix or adulterate by adding another substance:to dash wine with water.
  6. to ruin or frustrate (hopes, plans, etc.):The rain dashed our hopes for a picnic.
  7. to depress;
    dispirit:The failure dashed his spirits.
  8. to confound or abash:His rejection dashed and humiliated him.

v.i. 
  1. to strike with violence:The waves dashed against the cliff.
  2. to move with violence;
    rush:The horses dashed out of the burning stable.
  3. dash off: 
    • to hurry away;
      leave:I must dash off now.
    • Also,  dash down. to write, make, accomplish, etc., hastily:We dashed off a letter to announce the news. He dashed down a memo.

n. 
  1. a small quantity of anything thrown into or mixed with something else:a dash of salt.
  2. a hasty or sudden movement;
    a rush or sudden onset:They all made a dash for the door.
  3. the mark or sign (—) used to note an abrupt break or pause in a sentence or hesitation in an utterance, to begin and end a parenthetic word, phrase, or clause, to indicate the omission of letters or words, to divide a line, to substitute for certain uses of the colon, and to separate any of various elements of a sentence or series of sentences, as a question from its answer.
  4. the throwing or splashing of liquid against something:the dash of the waves against the dock.
  5. the sound of such splashing:The dash of the waves on the beach could be heard from afar.
  6. spirited action;
    élan;
    vigor in action or style:The dancer performed with spirit and dash.
  7. [Track.]a short race:a 100-yard dash.
  8. Automotivedashboard (def. 1).
  9. Telecommunicationsa signal of longer duration than a dot, used in groups of dots, dashes, and spaces to represent letters, as in Morse code.
  10. a hasty stroke, esp. of a pen.
  11. [Archaic.]a violent and rapid blow or stroke.
  12. Idiomscut a dash, to make a striking impression;
    be ostentatious or showy.
  • Old Norse; compare Danish daske slap, flap, Swedish daska; (noun, nominal) Middle English: blow, clash, derivative of the verb, verbal
  • (verb, verbal) Middle English dasshen, perh. 1250–1300
    • 10.See corresponding entry in Unabridged dart, bolt. See  rush 1.
    • 12.See corresponding entry in Unabridged pinch, bit;
      touch.

dash2  (dash),USA pronunciation v.t. [Chiefly Brit.]
  1. British Termsto damn (usually used interjectionally).
  • euphemism based on d—n, printed form of damn 1790–1800

dash3  (dash),USA pronunciation (in West Africa)
n. 
  1. a tip, bribe, or recompense.
  2. bribery.

v.t. 
  1. to give a tip or bribe to (esp. a government employee).
[1780–1790;
perh. first recorded in D as dache, dasche (1602);
orig. uncert., but often alleged to be Pg das (you) give (2d sing. pres. indic. of dar to give)]


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

dasher /ˈdæʃə/ n
  1. one that dashes
  2. Canadian the ledge along the top of the boards of an ice hockey rink



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