WordReference can't find this exact phrase, but click on each word to see its meaning:

date format

ⓘ One or more forum threads is an exact match of your searched term. Click here.

We could not find the full phrase you were looking for.
The entry for "date" is displayed below.

Also see:format

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2016
date1 /deɪt/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  dat•ed, dat•ing. 
n. [countable]
  1. time in terms of the month, day, and year at which some event happened or will happen:an important date in American history.
  2. the particular day of the month:Is today's date the 7th or the 8th?
  3. the time shown on a letter, document, coin, etc.:a letter bearing the date January 16.
  4. the time or period to which something belongs:can meet again at a later date.
  5. an appointment for a particular time, esp. a social meeting:I took her out on a date. We made a date for next week.
  6. a person with whom one has such an appointment:Can I bring a date to the party?
  7. Show Businessan engagement (of a band, acting group, etc.) to perform;
    booking:the group's next date in Tennessee.

v. 
  1. to belong to a particular period;
    start or exist from: [no obj]:The architecture dates as far back as 1830.[+ from + object]The letter dates from 1873.[+ back + to + object]The custom dates back to the Victorian era.
  2. to go out socially on dates (with): [no object]She's not old enough to be dating.[ + obj]:He's dating his best friend's sister.
  3. [ + obj] to mark or furnish with a date:The word processor dates your document automatically.
  4. [ + obj] to estimate the period or time of:a new method to date archaeological ruins.
  5. [ + obj] to show the age of:Singing those tunes from the 1950's really dates me.
Idioms
  1. Idiomsto date, up to the present time;
    until now:We've seen nothing to date that would change our minds.
  2. Idiomsup to date, in accord with the latest styles, information, or technology:fashion that is always up to date;Our new computers are up to date;the up-to-date office communication systems.

dat•a•ble, date•a•ble, adj. 
dat•er, n. [countable]

date2 /deɪt/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Plant Biology, Foodthe oblong, brown, sweet, fleshy fruit of a palm tree growing in hot climates.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2016
date1  (dāt),USA pronunciation n., v.,  dat•ed, dat•ing. 
n. 
  1. a particular month, day, and year at which some event happened or will happen:July 4, 1776 was the date of the signing of the Declaration of Independence.
  2. the day of the month:Is today's date the 7th or the 8th?
  3. an inscription on a writing, coin, etc., that shows the time, or time and place, of writing, casting, delivery, etc.:a letter bearing the date January 16.
  4. the time or period to which any event or thing belongs;
    period in general:at a late date.
  5. the time during which anything lasts;
    duration:The pity is that childhood has so short a date.
  6. an appointment for a particular time:They have a date with their accountant at ten o'clock.
  7. a social appointment, engagement, or occasion arranged beforehand with another person:to go out on a date on Saturday night.
  8. a person with whom one has such a social appointment or engagement:Can I bring a date to the party?
  9. an engagement for an entertainer to perform.
  10. dates, the birth and death dates, usually in years, of a person:Dante's dates are 1265 to 1321.
  11. Idiomsto date, up to the present time;
    until now:This is his best book to date.
  12. Idiomsup to date, in agreement with or inclusive of the latest information;
    modern:Bring us up to date on the news.

v.i. 
  1. to have or bear a date:The letter dates from 1873.
  2. to belong to a particular period;
    have its origin:That dress dates from the 19th century. The architecture dates as far back as 1830.
  3. to reckon from some point in time:The custom dates from the days when women wore longer skirts.
  4. to go out socially on dates:She dated a lot during high school.

v.t. 
  1. to mark or furnish with a date:Please date the check as of today.
  2. to ascertain or fix the period or point in time of;
    assign a period or point in time to:The archaeologist dated the ruins as belonging to the early Minoan period.
  3. to show the age of;
    show to be old-fashioned.
  4. to make a date with;
    go out on dates with:He's been dating his best friend's sister.
data•ble, datea•ble, adj. 
data•ble•ness, datea•ble•ness, n. 
dater, n. 
  • Late Latin data, noun, nominal use of data (feminine of datus, past participle of dare to give), from the phrase data (Romae) written, given (at Rome); (verb, verbal) Middle English daten to sign or date a document, derivative of the noun, nominal
  • Middle French
  • (noun, nominal) Middle English 1275–1325

date2  (dāt),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Plant Biology, Foodthe oblong, fleshy fruit of the date palm, a staple food in northern Africa, Arabia, etc., and an important export.
  • Latin dactylus; see dactyl
  • Medieval Latin datil(l)us (Old Provencal, Catalan, Spanish datil)
  • Anglo-French; Old French dade, date
  • Middle English 1250–1300


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

date /deɪt/ n
  1. a specified day of the month: today's date is October 27
  2. the particular day or year of an event: the date of the Norman Conquest was 1066
  3. an inscription on a coin, letter, etc, stating when it was made or written
  4. an appointment for a particular time, esp with a person to whom one is sexually or romantically attached: she has a dinner date
  5. the person with whom the appointment is made
vb
  1. (transitive) to mark (a letter, coin, etc) with the day, month, or year
  2. (transitive) to assign a date of occurrence or creation to
  3. (intr; followed by from or back to) to have originated (at a specified time): his decline dates from last summer
  4. (transitive) to reveal the age of: that dress dates her
  5. to make or become old-fashioned: some good films hardly date at all
  6. informal chiefly US Canadian to be a boyfriend or girlfriend of (someone of the opposite sex)
  7. to accompany (a member of the opposite sex) on a date
Etymology: 14th Century: from Old French, from Latin dare to give, as in the phrase epistula data Romae letter handed over at Rome

ˈdatable, ˈdateable adj USAGE
year

date /deɪt/ n
  1. the fruit of the date palm, having sweet edible flesh and a single large woody seed
  2. short for date palm
Etymology: 13th Century: from Old French, from Latin, from Greek daktulos finger



Advertisements

Word of the day: Intermediate+ stroke

Advertisements
Report an inappropriate ad.