decree

Listen:
 /dɪˈkriː/

ⓘ One or more forum threads is an exact match of your searched term. Click here.


WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2016
de•cree /dɪˈkri/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  -creed, -cree•ing. 
n. 
    [countable]
    1. a formal order usually having the force of law:a presidential decree.
    2. Lawa judicial decision or order:The judge issued a decree forbidding him to leave the state.

    v. 
    1. to command, order, or decide by or as if by decree: [ + obj]:The king decreed an amnesty.[ + (that) clause]:The judge decreed that the parent could visit the children five times a year.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2016
de•cree  (di krē),USA pronunciation n., v.,  -creed, -cree•ing. 
n. 
  1. a formal and authoritative order, esp. one having the force of law:a presidential decree.
  2. Lawa judicial decision or order.
  3. Religion[Theol.]one of the eternal purposes of God, by which events are foreordained.

v.t., v.i. 
  1. to command, ordain, or decide by decree.
  • Latin dēcrētum, noun, nominal use of neuter of dēcrētus, past participle of dēcernere; see decern; (verb, verbal) Middle English decreen, derivative of the noun, nominal
  • Anglo-French decre, decret
  • (noun, nominal) Middle English decre 1275–1325


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

decree /dɪˈkriː/ n
  1. an edict, law, etc, made by someone in authority
  2. an order or judgment of a court made after hearing a suit, esp in matrimonial proceedings
vb (decrees, decreeing, decreed)
  1. to order, adjudge, or ordain by decree
Etymology: 14th Century: from Old French decre, from Latin dēcrētum ordinance, from dēcrētus decided, past participle of dēcernere to determine; see decern



'decree' also found in these entries:
Advertisements

Word of the day: Intermediate+ strike

Advertisements
Report an inappropriate ad.