deferred

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 [dɪˈfɜːd]



WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
de•ferred  (di fûrd),USA pronunciation adj. 
  1. postponed or delayed.
  2. suspended or withheld for or until a certain time or event:a deferred payment; deferred taxes.
  3. Militaryclassified as temporarily exempt from induction into military service.
  • defer1 + -ed2 1645–55

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
de•fer1 /dɪˈfɜr/USA pronunciation   v. [ + obj], -ferred, -fer•ring. 
  1. to postpone;
    delay;
    put off action on:The pension is deferred until after age 65.
  2. Militaryto exempt temporarily from being drafted into military service:He was deferred because he was in college.
de•fer•ment , n. [countable]He tried to get a deferment from military service.See -fer-.

de•fer2 /dɪˈfɜr/USA pronunciation   v. [ + to + obj], -ferred, -fer•ring. 
  1. to yield respectfully in judgment or opinion:I deferred to my father's authority.
See -fer-.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
de•fer1  (di fûr),USA pronunciation v.,  -ferred, -fer•ring. 
v.t. 
  1. to put off (action, consideration, etc.) to a future time:The decision has been deferred by the board until next week.
  2. Militaryto exempt temporarily from induction into military service.

v.i. 
  1. to put off action;
    delay.
de•ferrer, n. 
  • Middle English deferren, variant of differren to differ 1325–75
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged Defer, delay, postpone imply keeping something from occurring until a future time. To
      defer is to decide to do something later on:to defer making a payment.To
      delay is sometimes equivalent to
      defer, but usually it is to act in a dilatory manner and thus lay something aside:to delay one's departure.To
      postpone a thing is to put it off to (usually) some particular time in the future, with the intention of beginning or resuming it then:to postpone an election.
    • 3.See corresponding entry in Unabridged procrastinate.

de•fer2  (di fûr),USA pronunciation v.,  -ferred, -fer•ring. 
v.i. 
  1. to yield respectfully in judgment or opinion (usually fol. by to):We all defer to him in these matters.

v.t. 
  1. to submit for decision;
    refer:We defer questions of this kind to the president.
  • Latin dēferre to carry from or down, report, accuse, equivalent. to dē- de- + ferre to bear1
  • late Middle English deferren 1400–50
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged accede, submit, acquiesce, capitulate.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

defer /dɪˈfɜː/ vb ( -fers, -ferring, -ferred)
  1. (transitive) to delay or cause to be delayed until a future time; postpone
Etymology: 14th Century: from Old French differer to be different, postpone; see differ

deˈferrer n
defer /dɪˈfɜː/ vb ( -fers, -ferring, -ferred)
  1. (intransitive) followed by to: to yield (to) or comply (with) the wishes or judgments of another
Etymology: 15th Century: from Latin dēferre, literally: to bear down, from de- + ferre to bear



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