WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2015
dik•tat  (dik tät), 
n. 
  1. Governmenta harsh, punitive settlement or decree imposed unilaterally on a defeated nation, political party, etc.
  2. any decree or authoritative statement:The Board of Education issued a diktat that all employees must report an hour earlier.
Etymology:
  • Latin dictātus, past participle of dictāre to dictate
  • German: literally, something dictated
  • 1930–35

diktat, +n. 
any decree or authoritative statement:The Board of Education issued a diktat that all employees must report an hour earlier.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

diktat /ˈdɪktɑːt/ n
  1. decree or settlement imposed, esp by a ruler or a victorious nation
  2. a dogmatic statement
Etymology: German: dictation, from Latin dictātum, from dictāre to dictate



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