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WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2016
dol•phin /ˈdɑlfɪn, ˈdɔl-/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Mammalsa small-toothed mammal of the sea having a beaklike nose and mouth. Compare porpoise.
  2. FishAlso called ˈdol•phinˌfish mahimahi. either of two large, slender fishes of warm and temperate seas.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2016
dol•phin  (dolfin, dôl-),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Mammalsany of several chiefly marine, cetacean mammals of the family Delphinidae, having a fishlike body, numerous teeth, and the front of the head elongated into a beaklike projection.
  2. FishAlso called  dolphinfish, mahimahi. either of two large, slender fishes, Coryphaena hippurus or C. equisetis, of warm and temperate seas.
  3. [Naut.]
    • Naval Termsa pile, cluster of piles, or buoy to which a vessel may be moored in open water.
    • Naval Termsa cluster of piles used as a fender, as at the entrance to a dock.
    • Naval Termsa pudding fender at the nose of a tugboat or on the side of a vessel.
  4. (cap.) [Astron.]the constellation Delphinus.
  • Greek delphí̄n
  • Vulgar Latin *dalfīnus, Latin delphīnus
  • Old Provencal dalfin
  • Old French daulphin
  • Middle English dolphyn 1300–50

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

dolphin /ˈdɒlfɪn/ n
  1. any of various marine cetacean mammals of the family Delphinidae, esp Delphinus delphis, that are typically smaller than whales and larger than porpoises and have a beaklike snout
  2. river dolphinany freshwater cetacean of the family Platanistidae, inhabiting rivers of North and South America and S Asia. They are smaller than marine dolphins and have a longer narrower snout

  3. Also called: dorado either of two large marine percoid fishes, Coryphaena hippurus or C. equisetis, that resemble the cetacean dolphins and have an iridescent coloration
  4. a post or buoy for mooring a vessel
Etymology: 13th Century: from Old French dauphin, via Latin, from Greek delphin-, delphis

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