effort

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 /ˈefət/



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2015
ef•fort /ˈɛfɚt/USA pronunciation   n. 
  1. [uncountable] the use of physical or mental power:It will take great effort to achieve a victory.
  2. [countable] a try;
    an attempt.
  3. [countable] something done by hard work.
ef•fort•less,adj. 
ef•fort•less•ly,adv. See -fort-.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2015
ef•fort  (efərt), 
n. 
  1. exertion of physical or mental power:It will take great effort to achieve victory.
  2. an earnest or strenuous attempt:an effort to keep to the schedule.
  3. something done by exertion or hard work:I thought it would be easy, but it was an effort.
  4. an achievement, as in literature or art:The painting is one of his finest efforts.
  5. the amount of exertion expended for a specified purpose:the war effort.
  6. [Chiefly Brit.]
    • an organized community drive or achievement.
    • a fund-raising drive.
  7. Mechanics[Mech.]the force or energy that is applied to a machine for the accomplishment of useful work.
Etymology:
  • Middle French; Old French esfort, esforz, derivative of esforcier to force (es- ex-1 + forcier to force)
  • 1480–90
1 . struggle, striving. Effort, application, endeavor, exertion imply actions directed or force expended toward a definite end. Effort is an expenditure of energy to accomplish some objective:He made an effort to control himself.Application is continuous effort plus careful attention:constant application to duties.Endeavor means a continued and sustained series of efforts to achieve some, often worthy and difficult, end:a constant endeavor to be useful.Exertion is the vigorous and often strenuous expenditure of energy, frequently without an end:out of breath from exertion.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

effort /ˈɛfət/ n
  1. physical or mental exertion, usually considerable when unqualified
  2. a determined attempt
  3. achievement; creation
Etymology: 15th Century: from Old French esfort, from esforcier to force, ultimately from Latin fortis strong; see force1

ˈeffortful adj



'effort' also found in these entries:
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