WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
es•cape /ɪˈskeɪp/USA pronunciation   v.,  -caped, -cap•ing, n., adj. 
v. 
  1. to slip or get away, as from confinement or jail:[~ (+ from + object)]How did the mice escape from their cage?
  2. to avoid (capture, punishment, injury, or the like): [+ object]The town escaped the worst of the storm.[no object]managed to escape with only cuts and bruises.
  3. to issue from a confining enclosure, as a gas or liquid:[no object]Air escaped from the balloon.
  4. to fail to remember or notice:[+ object]His name escapes me at the moment.

n. 
  1. [countable] an act or instance of escaping.
  2. a way or means of escaping: [countable]We used the tunnel as an escape.[uncountable]The back door is your only means of escape.
  3. a way or means of avoiding reality:[countable]liked to read mystery stories as an escape.

adj. [before a noun]
  1. for or providing an escape:an escape hatch.
  2. Computingbeing a key on a microcomputer keyboard, often used to return to a previous program screen:Hit the escape key.
    escape, elude, evade mean to keep free of something. To escape is to succeed in keeping away from danger, from being chased or observed, etc.:to escape punishment. To elude is to slip through an apparently tight net, thus avoiding, often by a narrow margin, whatever threatens;
    it implies using skill or cleverness to baffle or fool:The fox eluded the hounds by his clever twists and turns. To evade is to turn aside from or go out of reach of a person or thing, usually by using a trick to direct attention elsewhere:to evade the police.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
es•cape  (i skāp),USA pronunciation v.,  -caped, -cap•ing, n., adj. 
v.i. 
  1. to slip or get away, as from confinement or restraint;
    gain or regain liberty:to escape from jail.
  2. to slip away from pursuit or peril;
    avoid capture, punishment, or any threatened evil.
  3. to issue from a confining enclosure, as a fluid.
  4. to slip away;
    fade:The words escaped from memory.
  5. Botany(of an originally cultivated plant) to grow wild.
  6. Rocketry(of a rocket, molecule, etc.) to achieve escape velocity.

v.t. 
  1. to slip away from or elude (pursuers, captors, etc.):He escaped the police.
  2. to succeed in avoiding (any threatened or possible danger or evil):She escaped capture.
  3. to elude (one's memory, notice, search, etc.).
  4. to fail to be noticed or recollected by (a person):Her reply escapes me.
  5. (of a sound or utterance) to slip from or be expressed by (a person, one's lips, etc.) inadvertently.

n. 
  1. an act or instance of escaping.
  2. the fact of having escaped.
  3. a means of escaping:We used the tunnel as an escape.
  4. avoidance of reality:She reads mystery stories as an escape.
  5. leakage, as of water or gas, from a pipe or storage container.
  6. Botanya plant that originated in cultivated stock and is now growing wild.
  7. Rocketry, Physics[Physics, Rocketry.]the act of achieving escape velocity.
  8. Computinga key (frequently labeled ESC) found on microcomputer keyboards and used for any of various functions, as to interrupt a command or move from one part of a program to another.

adj. 
  1. for or providing an escape:an escape route.
es•capa•ble, adj. 
es•capeless, adj. 
es•caper, n. 
es•caping•ly, adv. 
  • Vulgar Latin *excappāre, verb, verbal derivative (with ex- ex-1) of Late Latin cappa hooded cloak (see cap1)
  • Old North French escaper (French échapper)
  • Middle English escapen, ascapen 1250–1300
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged flee, abscond, decamp.
    • 7.See corresponding entry in Unabridged dodge, flee, avoid.
      Escape, elude, evade mean to keep free of something. To
      escape is to succeed in keeping away from danger, pursuit, observation, etc.:to escape punishment.To
      elude implies baffling pursuers or slipping through an apparently tight net:The fox eluded the hounds.To
      evade is to turn aside from or go out of reach of a person or thing:to evade the police.See also  avoid. 
    • 12.See corresponding entry in Unabridged flight.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

escape /ɪˈskeɪp/ vb
  1. to get away or break free from (confinements, captors, etc)
  2. to manage to avoid (imminent danger, punishment, evil, etc)
  3. (intransitive) usually followed by from: (of gases, liquids, etc) to issue gradually, as from a crack or fissure; seep; leak
  4. (transitive) to elude; be forgotten by: the actual figure escapes me
  5. (transitive) to be articulated inadvertently or involuntarily: a roar escaped his lips
n
  1. the act of escaping or state of having escaped
  2. avoidance of injury, harm, etc
  3. a means or way of escape
  4. (as modifier): an escape route
  5. a means of distraction or relief, esp from reality or boredom
  6. a gradual outflow; leakage; seepage
  7. Also called: escape valve, escape cock a valve that releases air, steam, etc, above a certain pressure; relief valve or safety valve
  8. a plant that was originally cultivated but is now growing wild
Etymology: 14th Century: from Old Northern French escaper, from Vulgar Latin excappāre (unattested) to escape (literally: to remove one's cloak, hence free oneself), from ex-1 + Late Latin cappa cloak

esˈcapable adj esˈcaper n



'escape' also found in these entries:
Collocations: escape the [war, fire, collapse], a prison escape, is an escape artist, more...

Forum discussions with the word(s) "escape" in the title:


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