exercise

Listen:
 /ˈɛksəˌsaɪz/

ⓘ One or more forum threads is an exact match of your searched term. Click here.


WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2016
ex•er•cise /ˈɛksɚˌsaɪz/USA pronunciation   n., v., -cised, -cis•ing. 

n. 
  1. activity or exertion, esp. for the sake of practice, training, or improvement[uncountable]aerobic exercise.
  2. something done or performed as a means of practice or training[countable]dancing exercises.
  3. a putting into action, use, or effect[uncountable]the exercise of caution when driving.
  4. [countable] a written composition, musical piece, or artistic work done for practice or learning.

v. 
  1. to (cause to) go through exercises: [+ object]They exercised their muscles.[no object]We exercised for a full hour.
  2. to put into action, practice, or use[+ object]They exercised their right to vote.
ex•er•cis•er,n.  [countable]

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2016
ex•er•cise  (eksər sīz′), 
n., v., -cised, -cis•ing. 

n. 
  1. bodily or mental exertion, esp. for the sake of training or improvement of health:Walking is good exercise.
  2. something done or performed as a means of practice or training:exercises for the piano.
  3. a putting into action, use, operation, or effect:the exercise of caution.
  4. a written composition, musical piece, or artistic work executed for practice or to illustrate a particular aspect of technique.
  5. Often,exercises. a traditional ceremony:graduation exercises.
  6. Religiona religious observance or service.

v.t. 
  1. to put through exercises, or forms of practice or exertion, designed to train, develop, condition, or the like:to exercise a horse.
  2. to put (faculties, rights, etc.) into action, practice, or use:to exercise freedom of speech.
  3. to use or display in one's action or procedure:to exercise judgment.
  4. to make use of (one's privileges, powers, etc.):to exercise one's constitutional rights.
  5. to discharge (a function); perform:to exercise the duties of one's office.
  6. to have as an effect:to exercise an influence on someone.
  7. to worry; make uneasy;
    annoy:to be much exercised about one's health.

v.i. 
  1. to go through exercises;
    take bodily exercise.
Etymology:
  • Latin exercitium, equivalent. to exercit(us) past participle of exercēre to train (ex- ex-1 + -ercit-, stem of combining form of arcēre to restrain) + -ium noun, nominal suffix
  • Middle French exercice
  • Middle English (noun, nominal) 1300–50
exer•cis′a•ble, adj. 
1 . activity;
calisthenics, gymnastics. 2 . Exercise, drill, practice refer to activities undertaken for training in some skill. Exercise is the most general term and may be either physical or mental:an exercise in arithmetic.Drill is disciplined repetition of set exercises, often performed in a group, directed by a leader:military drill.Practice is repeated or methodical exercise:Even great musicians require constant practice. 3 . employment, application, practice, performance. 6 . ritual. 7 . discipline, drill, school. 9 . employ, apply, exert, practice. 13 . try, trouble.
1 . inaction.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

exercise /ˈɛksəˌsaɪz/ vb (mainly tr)
  1. to put into use; employ: to exercise tact
  2. (intransitive) to take exercise or perform exercises; exert one's muscles, etc, esp in order to keep fit
  3. to practise using in order to develop or train: to exercise one's voice
  4. to perform or make proper use of: to exercise one's rights
  5. to bring to bear; exert: to exercise one's influence
  6. (often passive) to occupy the attentions of, esp so as to worry or vex: to be exercised about a decision
  7. to carry out or cause to carry out, manoeuvres, simulated combat operations, etc
n
  1. physical exertion, esp for the purpose of development, training, or keeping fit
  2. mental or other activity or practice, esp in order to develop a skill
  3. a set of movements, questions, tasks, etc, designed to train, improve, or test one's ability in a particular field: piano exercises
  4. a performance or work of art done as practice or to demonstrate a technique
  5. the performance of a function; discharge: the exercise of one's rights, the object of the exercise is to win
  6. (sometimes plural) a manoeuvre or simulated combat operation carried out for training and evaluation
  7. (usually plural) US Canadian a ceremony or formal routine, esp at a school or college: opening exercises, graduation exercises
  8. a particular type of event, such as performing on the horizontal bar
Etymology: 14th Century: from Old French exercice, from Latin exercitium, from exercēre to drill, from ex-1 + arcēre to ward off

ˈexerˌcisable adj



'exercise' also found in these entries:

Forum discussions with the word(s) "exercise" in the title:


Look up "exercise" at Merriam-Webster
Look up "exercise" at dictionary.com

In other languages: Spanish | French | Italian | Portuguese | German | Swedish | Dutch | Russian | Polish | Romanian | Czech | Greek | Turkish | Chinese | Japanese | Korean | Arabic

Advertisements

Download free Android and iPhone apps

Android AppiPhone App

Report an inappropriate ad.