WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2015
ex•po•si•tion /ˌɛkspəˈzɪʃən/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. a large public exhibition: an automobile exposition.
  2. Rhetorica detailed explanation:gave an exposition of his views.
See -pos-.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2015
ex•po•si•tion  (ek′spə zishən), 
  1. a large-scale public exhibition or show, as of art or manufactured products:an exposition of 19th-century paintings; an automobile exposition.
  2. Rhetoricthe act of expounding, setting forth, or explaining:the exposition of a point of view.
  3. Rhetoricwriting or speech primarily intended to convey information or to explain; a detailed statement or explanation;
    explanatory treatise:The students prepared expositions on familiar essay topics.
  4. the act of presenting to view;
    display:The singer gave a splendid exposition of vocal talent.
  5. exposure (def. 10).
  6. the state of being exposed;
  7. Music and Dance[Music.]the first section of a fugue or a sonata form, in which the principal themes normally are introduced.
  8. Theater, Literature(in a play, novel, etc.) dialogue, description, etc., that gives the audience or reader the background of the characters and the present situation.
  • Latin expositiōn- (stem of expositiō), equivalent. to exposit(us) (see expose) + -iōn- -ion
  • Middle English exposicioun 1300–50
ex′po•sition•al, adj. 
1 . exhibit, demonstration, display, presentation. 3 . elucidation, commentary;
critique, interpretation, exegesis, explication.

Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

exposition /ˌɛkspəˈzɪʃən/ n
  1. a systematic, usually written statement about, commentary on, or explanation of a specific subject
  2. the act of expounding or setting forth information or a viewpoint
  3. a large public exhibition, esp of industrial products or arts and crafts
  4. the act of exposing or the state of being exposed
  5. the first statement of the subjects or themes of a movement in sonata form or a fugue
  6. the exhibiting of the consecrated Eucharistic Host or a relic for public veneration
Etymology: 14th Century: from Latin expositiō a setting forth, from expōnere to display; see exponent

ˌexpoˈsitional adj

'exposition' also found in these entries:

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