face

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 [ˈfeɪs]



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
face /feɪs/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  faced, fac•ing. 
n. 
  1. Anatomy[countable] the front part of the head.
  2. a look or expression on the face:[countable]a sad face.
  3. outward appearance:[countable;  usually singular]The pioneers changed the face of the wilderness.
  4. the surface of something:[countable;  usually singular]The ship seems to have disappeared from the face of the earth.

v. 
  1. to look toward:[+ object]She turned and faced the sea.
  2. to have the front toward: [+ object]The barn faces the field.[no object]The barn faced south.
  3. to confront or meet directly or boldly:[+ object]You have to face facts.
  4. face up to, [+ up + to + object]
    • to admit:You must face up to your mistake.
    • to meet courageously:He had to face up to the possibility of losing his job.
Idioms
  1. Idiomsface to face: 
    • opposite one another;
      facing:The dancers stood face to face with their partners.
    • confronting one another:The two candidates finally met face to face.
  2. Idiomsin the face of, in spite of;
    notwithstanding:He was steadfast in the face of many obstacles.
  3. lose face, to be humiliated or embarrassed:It was impossible to apologize publicly without losing face.
  4. Idiomsmake a face, to put an exaggerated expression, as of dismay or disgust, on one's face: [no object]After the teacher scolded her, the child made a face and sat down.[ make + a + ~ + at + obj]:The child made a face at the dentist.
  5. Idiomsto someone's face, in one's very presence:Tell her how you feel to her face.

See -face-.
-face-, 
  • [root.]-face- comes from Latin, where it has the meaning "form;
    face;
    make''. It is related to -fac-. This meaning is found in such words as: deface, facade, face, facet, facial, surface.

  • WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    face  (fās),USA pronunciation n., v.,  faced, fac•ing. 
    n. 
    1. Anatomythe front part of the head, from the forehead to the chin.
    2. a look or expression on this part:a sad face.
    3. an expression or look that indicates ridicule, disgust, etc.;
      grimace:The child put on a face when told to go to bed.
    4. Clothingcosmetics;
      makeup:Excuse me while I go to the powder room to put on my face.
    5. impudence;
      boldness:to have the face to ask such a rude question.
    6. outward appearance:These are just old problems with new faces. The future presented a fair face to the fortunate youth.
    7. outward show or pretense, esp. as a means of preserving one's dignity or of concealing a detrimental fact, condition, etc.:Though shamed beyond words, he managed to show a bold face.
    8. good reputation;
      dignity;
      prestige:They hushed up the family scandal to preserve face.
    9. the amount specified in a bill or note, exclusive of interest.
    10. the manifest sense or express terms, as of a document.
    11. Geography, Place Namesthe geographic characteristics or general appearance of a land surface.
    12. the surface:the face of the earth.
    13. the side, or part of a side, upon which the use of a thing depends:the clock's face; the face of a playing card.
    14. the most important or most frequently seen side;
      front:the face of a building.
    15. Clothing, Textilesthe outer or upper side of a fabric;
      right side.
    16. the acting, striking, or working surface of an implement, tool, etc.
    17. Mathematics[Geom.]any of the bounding surfaces of a solid figure:a cube has six faces.
    18. MiningAlso called  working face. the front or end of a drift or excavation, where the material is being or was last mined.
    19. [Print.]
      • Printingthe working surface of a type, of a plate, etc. See diag. under  type. 
      • PrintingAlso called  typeface. any design of type, including a full range of characters, as letters, numbers, and marks of punctuation, in all sizes:Caslon is one of the most popular faces.See table under  typeface. 
      • PrintingAlso called  typeface. the general style or appearance of type:broad or narrow face.
    20. Aeronautics, Nautical, Naval Terms[Naut., Aeron.]the rear or after side of a propeller blade (opposed to back).
    21. [Fort.]either of the two outer sides that form the salient angle of a bastion or the like. See diag. under  bastion. 
    22. Crystallographyany of the plane surfaces of a crystal.
    23. Electronicsfaceplate (def. 3).
    24. [Archaic.]sight;
      presence:to flee from the face of the enemy.
    25. Idiomsface to face: 
      • facing or opposite one another:We sat face to face at the table.
      • in an open, personal meeting or confrontation:The leaders spoke face to face about a reduction in nuclear arms.
    26. Idiomsface to face with, in close proximity to;
      narrowly escaping;
      confronting:face to face with death.
    27. Idiomsfly in the face of. See  fly 1 (def. 21).
    28. Dialect Terms, Idiomsget out of someone's face (usually used imperatively)
      • Dialect Terms[Southern U.S.]go away!;
        leave.
      • Slang Termsto stop bothering or annoying someone.
    29. Idiomsin the face of: 
      • in spite of;
        notwithstanding:She persevered in the face of many obstacles.
      • when confronted with:They were steadfast in the face of disaster.
    30. Idiomslose face, to suffer disgrace, humiliation, or embarrassment:It was impossible to apologize publicly without losing face.
    31. Idiomsmake a face, to grimace, as in distaste or contempt;
      contort one's face in order to convey a feeling or to amuse another:She made a face when she was told the work wasn't finished. The children made me laugh by making faces.
    32. Idiomson the face of it, to outward appearances;
      superficially;
      seemingly:On the face of it, there was no hope for a comeback.
    33. Idiomsput on a bold face, to give the appearance of confidence or assurance:Everyone knew that he had been fired, even though he put on a bold face.Also,  put a bold face on. 
    34. Idiomssave face, to avoid disgrace, humiliation, or embarrassment:She tried to save face by saying that the bill had never arrived.
    35. Idiomsset one's face against, to disapprove strongly of;
      oppose:My parents have set their face against my becoming an actress.
    36. Idiomsshow one's face, to make an appearance;
      be seen:I would be ashamed to show my face in such an outlandish outfit. Just show your face at the party and then you can leave.
    37. Idiomsto one's face, in one's presence;
      brazenly;
      directly:Tell him to his face that he's a liar!

    v.t. 
    1. to look toward or in the direction of:to face the light.
    2. to have the front toward or permit a view of:The building faces Fifth Avenue. The bedroom faces the park.
    3. to confront directly:to be faced with a problem; to face the future confidently.
    4. to confront courageously, boldly, or impudently (usually fol. by down or out):He could always face down his detractors.
    5. to oppose or to meet defiantly:to face fearful odds; Army faces Navy in today's football game.
    6. to cover or partly cover with a different material in front:They faced the old wooden house with brick.
    7. Clothingto finish the edge of a garment with facing.
    8. Gamesto turn the face of (a playing card) upwards.
    9. to dress or smooth the surface of (a stone or the like).
    10. Militaryto cause (soldiers) to turn to the right, left, or in the opposite direction.
    11. Sport[Ice Hockey.](of a referee) to put (the puck) in play by dropping it between two opposing players each having his or her stick on the ice and facing the goal of the opponent.

    v.i. 
    1. to turn or be turned (often fol. by to or toward):She faced toward the sea.
    2. to be placed with the front in a certain direction (often fol. by on, to, or toward):The house faces on the street. The barn faces south.
    3. to turn to the right, left, or in the opposite direction:Left face!
    4. Sport[Ice Hockey.]to face the puck (often fol. by off).
    5. face down, to confront boldly or intimidate (an opponent, critic, etc.).
    6. Sportface off, [Ice Hockey.]to start a game or period with a face-off.
    7. Idiomsface the music. See  music (def. 9).
    8. face up to: 
      • to acknowledge;
        admit:to face up to the facts.
      • to meet courageously;
        confront:He refused to face up to his problems.
    facea•ble, adj. 
    • Vulgar Latin *facia, for Latin faciēs facies; (verb, verbal) late Middle English facen, derivative of the noun, nominal
    • Anglo-French, Old French
    • (noun, nominal) Middle English 1250–1300
      • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged Face, countenance, visage refer to the front of the (usually human) head. The
        face is the combination of the features:a face with broad cheekbones.Countenance, a more formal word, denotes the face as it is affected by or reveals the state of mind, and hence often signifies the look or expression on the face:a thoughtful countenance.Visage, still more formal, refers to the face as seen in a certain aspect, esp. as revealing seriousness or severity:a stern visage.
      • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged appearance, aspect, mien.
      • 7.See corresponding entry in Unabridged exterior.
      • 14.See corresponding entry in Unabridged façade.
      • 43.See corresponding entry in Unabridged veneer.

    WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
    laugh /læf/USA pronunciation   v. 
    1. to express amusement, mirth, pleasure, happiness, and sometimes disrespect or nervousness with a sound or sounds ranging from a loud burst to a series of quiet chuckles:[no object]He laughed loudly.
    2. to drive, put, bring, etc., by or with laughter:[+ object]The audience laughed him off the stage.
    3. to utter with laughter:[+ object]He laughed his agreement.
    4. laugh at, [+ at + object]
      • to make fun of;
        ridicule:They laughed at his attempts to dance.
      • to find amusing:I always laugh at her jokes.
    5. laugh off, to dismiss as unimportant: [+ object + off]The president laughed the criticism off.[+ off + object]He laughed off the threats.

    n. [countable]
    1. the act or sound of laughing;
      laughter:The joke was worth a few laughs.
    2. a person or thing that causes laughter, amusement, or ridicule:That exam was a laugh; it was so easy.
    3. laughs, [plural][Informal.]fun;
      amusement:played a trick just for laughs.
    Idioms
    1. Idiomshave the last laugh, to prove successful despite the doubts of others.
    2. Idiomslaugh up or in one's sleeve, [no object] to be secretly amused;
      to make fun of something privately or secretly.
    3. Idiomsno laughing matter, something serious and not to be joked about or ridiculed.

    laugh•ing•ly, adv. 

    WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    laugh  (laf, läf ),USA pronunciation v.i. 
    1. to express mirth, pleasure, derision, or nervousness with an audible, vocal expulsion of air from the lungs that can range from a loud burst of sound to a series of quiet chuckles and is usually accompanied by characteristic facial and bodily movements.
    2. to experience the emotion so expressed:He laughed inwardly at the scene.
    3. to produce a sound resembling human laughter:A coyote laughed in the dark.

    v.t. 
    1. to drive, put, bring, etc., by or with laughter (often fol. by out, away, down, etc.):They laughed him out of town. We laughed away our troubles.
    2. to utter with laughter:He laughed his consent.
    3. laugh at: 
      • to make fun of;
        deride;
        ridicule:They were laughing at him, not along with him.
      • to be scornful of;
        reject:They stopped laughing at the unusual theory when it was found to be predictive.
      • to find sympathetic amusement in;
        regard with humor:We can learn to laugh a little at even our most serious foibles.
    4. laugh up one's sleeve. See  sleeve (def. 4).
    5. laugh off, to dismiss as ridiculous, trivial, or hollow:He had received threats but laughed them off as the work of a crank.
    6. laugh out of court, to dismiss or depreciate by means of ridicule;
      totally scorn:His violent protests were laughed out of court by the others.
    7. laugh out of the other side of one's mouth. to undergo a chastening reversal, as of glee or satisfaction that is premature;
      be ultimately chagrined, punished, etc.;
      cry:She's proud of her promotion, but she'll laugh out of the other side of her mouth when the work piles up.Also,  laugh on the wrong side of one's mouth or  face. 

    n. 
    1. the act or sound of laughing;
      laughter.
    2. an expression of mirth, derision, etc., by laughing.
    3. [Informal.]something that provokes laughter, amusement, or ridicule:After all the advance publicity, the prizefight turned out to be a laugh.
    4. laughs, [Informal.]fun;
      amusement.
    5. have the last laugh, to prove ultimately successful after a seeming defeat or loss:She smiled slyly, because she knew she would yet have the last laugh on them.
    • bef. 900; Middle English laughen, Old English hlæh(h)an (Anglian); cognate with Dutch, German lachen, Old Norse hlǣja, Gothic hlahjan
      • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged chortle, cackle, cachinnate, guffaw, roar;
        giggle, snicker, snigger, titter.
      • 11.See corresponding entry in Unabridged Laugh, chuckle, grin, smile refer to methods of expressing mirth, appreciation of humor, etc. A
        laugh may be a sudden, voiceless exhalation, but is usually an audible sound, either soft or loud:a hearty laugh.Chuckle suggests a barely audible series of sounds expressing private amusement or satisfaction:a delighted chuckle.A
        smile is a (usually pleasant) lighting up of the face and an upward curving of the corners of the lips (which may or may not be open);
        it may express amusement or mere recognition, friendliness, etc.:a courteous smile.A
        grin, in which the teeth are usually visible, is like an exaggerated smile, less controlled in expressing the feelings:a friendly grin.


    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

    face /feɪs/ n
    1. the front of the head from the forehead to the lower jaw; visage
    2. (as modifier): face flannel, face cream
    3. the expression of the countenance; look: a sad face
    4. a distorted expression, esp to indicate disgust; grimace
    5. informal make-up (esp in the phrase put one's face on)
    6. outward appearance: the face of the countryside is changing
    7. appearance or pretence (esp in the phrases put a bold, good, bad, etc, face on)
    8. worth in the eyes of others; dignity (esp in the phrases lose or save face)
    9. informal impudence or effrontery
    10. the main side of an object, building, etc, or the front: the face of a palace, a cliff face
    11. the marked surface of an instrument, esp the dial of a timepiece
    12. the functional or working side of an object, as of a tool or playing card
    13. the exposed area of a mine from which coal, ore, etc, may be mined
    14. (as modifier): face worker
    15. the uppermost part or surface: the face of the earth

    16. Also called: side any one of the plane surfaces of a crystal or other solid figure
    17. a steep side of a mountain, bounded by ridges
    18. Brit slang a well-known or important person

    19. Also called: typeface the printing surface of any type character
    20. the style, the design, or sometimes the size of any type fount
    21. in face of, in the face ofdespite
    22. on the face of itto all appearances
    23. set one's face againstto oppose with determination
    24. show one's faceto make an appearance
    25. to someone's facein someone's presence; directly and openly: I told him the truth to his face
    vb
    1. when intr, often followed by to, towards, or on: to look or be situated or placed (in a specified direction): the house faces on the square
    2. to be opposite: facing page 9
    3. (transitive) to meet or be confronted by: in his work he faces many problems
    4. (transitive) to provide with a surface of a different material
    5. to dress the surface of (stone or other material)
    6. (transitive) to expose (a card) with the face uppermost
    7. chiefly US to order (a formation) to turn in a certain direction or (of a formation) to turn as required: right face!

    See also face down, face up toEtymology: 13th Century: from Old French, from Vulgar Latin facia (unattested), from Latin faciēs form, related to facere to make



    'face' also found in these entries:
    Collocations: face the [front, back, corner], a [happy, sad, familiar, beautiful, smily, lovely] face, face [care, cream, wash], more...

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    Look up "face" at Merriam-Webster
    Look up "face" at dictionary.com

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