fuse

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WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2015
fuse1 /fyuz/USA pronunciation  n. [countable]
  • a tube, cord, or the like, filled or saturated with matter that burns easily and rapidly, used for igniting an explosive.
  • a mechanical or electronic device for detonating an explosive charge.
  • idiom
    1. have a short fuse,  [no obj][Informal.]to anger easily;
      have a quick temper.

    fuse•less, adj. 

    fuse2 /fyuz/USA pronunciation   n., v., fused, fus•ing. 

    n. [countable]
  • Electricitya safety device containing a material that conducts electricity that will melt when too much current runs through an electric circuit, breaking the circuit.

  • v. 
  • to (cause to) combine or blend by melting together;
    melt: [no object]The metal fused under the extreme heat.[+ object]The extreme heat will fuse these elements together.
  • [+ object] to cause to unite; blend:The author skillfully fuses these details into an interesting story.
  • idiom
      blow a fuse: 
      • [Informal.]to lose one's temper;
        become enraged.

    See -fus-.
    WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2015
    fuse1  (fyo̅o̅z), 
    n., v., fused, fus•ing. 

    n. 
  • a tube, cord, or the like, filled or saturated with combustible matter, for igniting an explosive.
  • fuze (def. 1).
  • have a short fuse, [Informal.]to anger easily;
    have a quick temper.

  • v.t. 
  • fuze (def. 3).
  • Etymology:
    • Latin fūsus spindle
    • Italian fuso
    • 1635–45
    fuseless, adj. 
    fuselike′, adj. 

    fuse2  (fyo̅o̅z), 
    n., v., fused, fus•ing. 

    n. 
  • Electricity[Elect.]a protective device, used in an electric circuit, containing a conductor that melts under heat produced by an excess current, thereby opening the circuit. Cf. circuit breaker.
  • Idiomsblow a fuse, [Informal.]to lose one's temper;
    become enraged:If I'm late again, they'll blow a fuse.

  • v.t. 
  • to combine or blend by melting together; melt.
  • to unite or blend into a whole, as if by melting together:The author skillfully fuses these fragments into a cohesive whole.

  • v.i. 
  • to become liquid under the action of heat;
    melt:At a relatively low temperature the metal will fuse.
  • to become united or blended:The two groups fused to create one strong union.
  • Electricity[Chiefly Brit.]to overload an electric circuit so as to burn out a fuse.
  • Etymology:
    • Latin fūsus melted, poured, cast, past participle of fundere
    • 1675–85
    3 . See melt. 

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

    fuse, US fuze /fjuːz/ n
    1. a lead of combustible black powder in a waterproof covering (safety fuse), or a lead containing an explosive (detonating fuse), used to fire an explosive charge
    2. any device by which an explosive charge is ignited
    vb
    1. (transitive) to provide or equip with such a fuse
    Etymology: 17th Century: from Italian fuso spindle, from Latin fūsus

    ˈfuseless adj
    fuse /fjuːz/ vb
    1. to unite or become united by melting, esp by the action of heat
    2. to become or cause to become liquid, esp by the action of heat; melt
    3. to join or become combined; integrate
    4. (transitive) to equip (an electric circuit, plug, etc) with a fuse
    5. Brit to fail or cause to fail as a result of the blowing of a fuse: the lights fused
    n
    1. a protective device for safeguarding electric circuits, etc, containing a wire that melts and breaks the circuit when the current exceeds a certain value
    Etymology: 17th Century: from Latin fūsus melted, cast, poured out, from fundere to pour out, shed; sense 5 influenced by fuse1



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