held

 /held/

For the verb: "to hold"

Simple Past: held
Past Participle: held

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2015
held /hɛld/USA pronunciation v. 

    pt. and pp. of hold1.hold

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2015
hold1 /hoʊld/USA pronunciation v., held/hɛld/USA pronunciationhold•ing,n. 

v. 
  • [+ object] to have or keep in the hand;
    grasp:I held her hand as we crossed the street.
  • [+ object] to bear, sustain, or support with or as if with the hands or arms:I held the baby gently.
  • [no object] to maintain a grasp; remain together or supported:The clamp held.
  • to (cause to) be, stay, or remain in a certain state: [+ object + adjective]The preacher held the audience spellbound.[no object; ~ + adjective]If you would just hold still, please.[no object]I hope our luck holds.
  • [+ object] to conduct; carry on:to hold an interview.
  • to detain: [+ object]The police held her for questioning.[+ object + as + object]He was held as a hostage for five years.[+ object + object]They held him a prisoner.
  • [+ object] to hinder; restrain;
    keep back:Please hold your applause.
  • [+ object] to set aside;
    reserve:Your tickets are being held at the counter.
  • [+ object] to possess; occupy:to hold a position of authority.
  • [+ object;
    not: be + ~-ing]
    to contain or be capable of containing:This bottle holds a quart.
  • [not: be + ~-ing] to keep in the mind; believe;
    have or express the belief of: [+ object]He held an opposing view.[+ that clause]Copernicus held that the earth revolves around the sun.
  • [+ with + object] to agree; sympathize:She doesn't hold with new ideas.
  • [+ (that) clause;
    not: be + ~-ing]
    to decide legally:The court held that the law was valid.
  • [+ object + adjective] to regard; consider:I hold you responsible for her safety.
  • [+ object] to make accountable:We will hold you to your word.
  • [no object; not: be + ~-ing] to remain valid:The argument still holds.
  • to keep by force: [+ object]Enemy forces held the hill.[no object]In spite of the shelling their positions held.
  • [+ object] to point; aim:held a gun on the prisoner.
  • Music and Dance[+ object] to keep going with;
    sustain:The soprano held that high note for fifteen seconds.
  • [+ object] to omit, as from an order:One burger — hold the pickle.
  • to keep (a telephone connection) open: [+ object]Can you hold the line for a moment?[no object]Please hold.
  • [+ object] to keep (a telephone call) from reaching someone:She asked her secretary to hold all her calls.
  • [+ object] to control oneself in spite of drinking (liquor):He can't hold his liquor.
  • hold back: 
    • to restrain; check;
      keep back;
      keep in control: [+ back + object]to hold back tears.[+ object + back]couldn't hold the tears back any longer.
    • to slow down, prevent, or stop the advancement of: [+ object + back]Nothing could hold them back from success.[+ back + object]What could hold back her career now?
    • to keep from giving or revealing; withhold: [+ back + object]to hold back information.[+ object + back]holding information back.
    • [no object] to keep from doing or taking action:The police held back from attacking the rioters.
    hold down: 
    • to keep under control or at a low level: [+ down + object]to hold down interest rates.[+ object + down]to hold interest rates down.
    • [+ down + object] to continue to function in:to hold down a job.
  • hold forth, [no object] to speak at great length.
  • hold off: 
    • to keep at a distance; keep back;
      repel: [+ off + object]The troops held off the latest assault.[+ object + off]They held the enemy off.
    • [no object] to postpone action; put off plans until later;
      defer:Let's hold off on that proposal for now.
    hold on, [no object]
    • to keep a firm grip on something:He took my arm and held on tightly.
    • to keep going; continue:The troops can hold on for another few days.
    • to keep a telephone connection open:Can you hold on while I see if he's here?
  • hold oneself in, [no object] to exercise control or restraint:He held himself in and didn't show his real feelings.
  • hold out: 
    • [+ out + object] to present; offer:When I said hello to them, they held out their hands in greeting.
    • [no object] to continue to last:Will the food hold out?
    • [no object] to refuse to give in:We are holding out for higher wages.
    • [no object] to withhold something expected or due:You'd better not be holding out on me.
    hold over: 
    • to keep for future discussion, consideration, or action: [+ object + over]We'll hold that discussion over for our next meeting.[+ over + object]We'll hold over that discussion for later.
    • to keep beyond the arranged period: [+ object + over]to hold a movie over for an extra week.[+ over + object]held over the movie.
    hold up: 
    • to support; uphold: [+ up + object]What holds up the bridge?[+ object + up]What holds the bridge up?
    • to delay; bring to a stop: [+ up + object]Something is holding up the work.[+ object + up]Something held the work up.
    • [no object] to endure; last;
      continue without losing strength or ability;
      persevere:How are you holding up under the strain?
    • to present for attention;
      display: [+ up + object]to hold up the youngest daughter as a model of good behavior.[+ object + up]to hold her up as a model of good behavior.
    • to rob at gunpoint: [+ up + object]to hold up a store.[+ object + up]He held them up and took their money.

    n. [countable]
  • an act of holding with the hand or other physical means:a good hold on the rope.
  • something to hold a thing by:climbing up using the toe holds on the mountainside.
  • something that holds fast or supports something else.
  • an order reserving something:to put a hold on a library book.
  • a controlling force or influence:Drugs had a powerful hold on them.
  • idiom
      get hold of, [+ object]
      • to grasp; seize:got hold of the line and pulled.
      • to find or obtain:Where can they get hold of the art supplies they need?
      • to communicate with by telephone:I couldn't get hold of you last week.
    1. Idiomsno holds barred, without limits:It would be a fight to the finish, no holds barred.
    on hold: 
    • into a state of interruption or waiting:The plans were put on hold indefinitely.
    • into a state of being kept waiting by a telephone hold:I've been on hold for a few minutes.

    hold•er, n. [countable]
    See contain.
    hold2 /hoʊld/USA pronunciation n. [countable]
    1. Naval Termsthe cargo space in the hull of a vessel.
    2. Aeronauticsthe cargo compartment of an aircraft.


    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

    held /hɛld/ vb
    1. the past tense and past participle of hold1



    hold /həʊld/ vb (holds, holding, held /hɛld/)
    1. to have or keep (an object) with or within the hands, arms, etc; clasp
    2. (transitive) to support or bear: to hold a drowning man's head above water
    3. to maintain or be maintained in a specified state or condition: to hold one's emotions in check, hold firm
    4. (transitive) to set aside or reserve: they will hold our tickets until tomorrow
    5. (when intr, usually used in commands) to restrain or be restrained from motion, action, departure, etc: hold that man until the police come
    6. (intransitive) to remain fast or unbroken: that cable won't hold much longer
    7. (intransitive) (of the weather) to remain dry and bright
    8. (transitive) to keep the attention of
    9. (transitive) to engage in or carry on: to hold a meeting
    10. (transitive) to have the ownership, possession, etc, of: he holds a law degree from London, who's holding the ace of spades?
    11. (transitive) to have the use of or responsibility for: to hold the office of director
    12. (transitive) to have the space or capacity for: the carton will hold only eight books
    13. (transitive) to be able to control the outward effects of drinking beer, spirits, etc
    14. often followed by to or by: to remain or cause to remain committed to: hold him to his promise, he held by his views in spite of opposition
    15. (tr; takes a clause as object) to claim: he holds that the theory is incorrect
    16. (intransitive) to remain relevant, valid, or true: the old philosophies don't hold nowadays
    17. (transitive) to regard or consider in a specified manner: I hold him very dear
    18. (transitive) to guard or defend successfully: hold the fort against the attack
    19. (sometimes followed by on) to sustain the sound of (a note) throughout its specified duration
    20. (transitive) to retain (data) in a storage device after copying onto another storage device or onto another location in the same device
    21. hold for, hold good forto apply or be relevant to: the same rules hold for everyone
    22. there is no holding himhe is so spirited or resolute that he cannot be restrained
    n
    1. the act or method of holding fast or grasping, as with the hands
    2. something to hold onto, as for support or control
    3. an object or device that holds fast or grips something else so as to hold it fast
    4. controlling force or influence: she has a hold on him
    5. a short delay or pause
    6. a prison or a cell in a prison
    7. a way of seizing one's opponent
    8. a pause or fermata
    9. a tenure or holding, esp of land
    10. (in combination): leasehold, freehold, copyhold
    11. archaic a fortified place
    12. no holds barredall limitations removed

    See also hold back, hold down, hold forth, hold in, hold off, hold on, hold out, hold over, hold-up, hold withEtymology: Old English healdan; related to Old Norse halla, Gothic haldan, German halten

    ˈholdable adj
    hold /həʊld/ n
    1. the space in a ship or aircraft for storing cargo
    Etymology: 16th Century: variant of hole



    'held' also found in these entries:

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