WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
in•firm /ɪnˈfɜrm/USA pronunciation   adj. 
  1. feeble or weak because of age:The old man was too infirm to walk.

n.  the infirm, [plural;  used with a plural verb]
  1. infirm people:care of the infirm.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
in•firm  (in fûrm),USA pronunciation adj. 
  1. feeble or weak in body or health, esp. because of age;
    ailing.
  2. unsteadfast, faltering, or irresolute, as persons or the mind;
    vacillating:infirm of purpose.
  3. not firm, solid, or strong:an infirm support.
  4. unsound or invalid, as an argument or a property title.

v.t. 
  1. to invalidate.
in•firmly, adv. 
in•firmness, n. 
  • Latin infirmus. See in-3, firm1
  • Middle English infirme 1325–75
    • 1, 3.See corresponding entry in Unabridged
    • 4.See corresponding entry in Unabridged weak.
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged wavering, indecisive.
    • 3.See corresponding entry in Unabridged rickety, tottering, shaky, unsteady.
    • 1, 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged
    • 3.See corresponding entry in Unabridged strong.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

infirm /ɪnˈfɜːm/ adj
  1. weak in health or body, esp from old age
  2. (as collective noun; preceded by the): the infirm
  3. lacking moral certainty; indecisive or irresolute
  4. not stable, sound, or secure: an infirm structure, an infirm claim
  5. (of a law, custom, etc) lacking legal force; invalid

inˈfirmly adv inˈfirmness n



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