jovial

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 /ˈdʒəʊvɪəl/



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
jo•vi•al /ˈdʒoʊviəl/USA pronunciation   adj. 
  1. showing hearty good humor or a spirit of friendliness; cheerful;
    jolly:a jovial smile.
jo•vi•al•i•ty /ˌdʒoʊviˈælɪti/USA pronunciation  n. [uncountable]
jo•vi•al•ly, adv.: He greeted her jovially.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
jo•vi•al  ( jōvē əl),USA pronunciation adj. 
  1. endowed with or characterized by a hearty, joyous humor or a spirit of good-fellowship:a wonderfully jovial host.
  2. Mythology(cap.) of or pertaining to the god Jove, or Jupiter.
jovi•al•ly, adv. 
jovi•al•ness, n. 
  • Medieval Latin joviālis of Jupiter (the planet, supposed to exert a happy influence), equivalent. to Latin jovi- (see Jovian) + -ālis -al1
  • 1580–90
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged merry, jolly, convivial, gay, joyful, mirthful.
      Jovial, jocose, jocular, jocund agree in referring to someone who is in a good humor.
      Jovial suggests a hearty, joyous humor:a jovial person.Jocose refers to that which causes laughter;
      it suggests someone who is playful and given to jesting:with jocose and comical airs.Jocular means humorous, facetious, mirthful, and waggish:jocular enough to keep up the spirits of all around him.Jocund, now a literary word, suggests a cheerful, light-hearted, and sprightly gaiety:glad and jocund company.
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged gloomy.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

jovial /ˈdʒəʊvɪəl/ adj
  1. having or expressing convivial humour; jolly
Etymology: 16th Century: from Latin joviālis of (the planet) Jupiter, considered by astrologers to foster good humour

ˌjoviˈality, ˈjovialness n ˈjovially adv



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