WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
lease1 /lis/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  leased, leas•ing. 
n. [countable]
  1. Businessa contract allowing the use of land, renting property, etc., to another for a certain period in exchange for rent or other payment.
  2. the period of time for which a lease is made:a five-year lease.

v. 
  1. to grant the temporary possession or use of (lands, property, etc.) to another, usually for compensation at a fixed rate;
    to let: [+ object (+ to + object)]to lease one's apartment to a friend.[+ object + object]We leased him the apartment.[no object]to lease at a lower rate.
  2. to take or hold by lease:[+ object (+ from + object)]He leased the farm from the sheriff.
Idioms
  1. Idiomsa new lease on life, [countable] a chance to improve one's situation or to live longer or more happily:After his heart operation he felt he had a new lease on life.

leas•er, n. [countable]

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
lease1  (lēs),USA pronunciation n., v.,  leased, leas•ing. 
n. 
  1. Businessa contract renting land, buildings, etc., to another;
    a contract or instrument conveying property to another for a specified period or for a period determinable at the will of either lessor or lessee in consideration of rent or other compensation.
  2. the property leased.
  3. the period of time for which a lease is made:a five-year lease.
  4. Idiomsa new lease on life, a chance to improve one's situation or to live longer or more happily:Plastic surgery gave him a new lease on life.

v.t. 
  1. to grant the temporary possession or use of (lands, tenements, etc.) to another, usually for compensation at a fixed rate;
    let:She plans to lease her apartment to a friend.
  2. to take or hold by lease:He leased the farm from the sheriff.

v.i. 
  1. to grant a lease;
    let or rent:to lease at a lower rental.
leasa•ble, adj. 
leaseless, adj. 
leaser, n. 
  • Latin laxāre to release, let go. See lax
  • Anglo-French (equivalent. to Old French lais, French legs legacy), noun, nominal derivative of lesser to lease, literally, let go (equivalent. to Old French laissier)
  • Middle English les 1350–1400
    • 6.See corresponding entry in Unabridged rent, charter, hire.

lease2  (lēs),USA pronunciation n. [Textiles.]
  1. Textilesa system for keeping the warp in position and under control by alternately crossing the warp yarn over and under the lease rods.
  2. Textilesthe order of drawing in the warp ends.
  • Middle English lese length or coil of thread, variant of lesh leash 1350–1400


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

lease /liːs/ n
  1. a contract by which property is conveyed to a person for a specified period, usually for rent
  2. the instrument by which such property is conveyed
  3. the period of time for which it is conveyed
  4. a prospect of renewed health, happiness, etc: a new lease of life
vb (transitive)
  1. to grant possession of (land, buildings, etc) by lease
  2. to take a lease of (property); hold under a lease
Etymology: 15th Century: via Anglo-French from Old French lais (n), from laissier to let go, from Latin laxāre to loosen

ˈleasable adj ˈleaser n



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