leash

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 /liːʃ/

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WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2016
leash /liʃ/USA pronunciation   n. 
  1. [countable] a chain, strap, etc., for controlling or leading a dog or other animal;
    a lead.
  2. control;
    restraint[uncountable]to keep one's temper in leash.

v. [+ object]
  1. to secure or control by or as if by a leash:Leash your dog.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2016
leash  (lēsh), 
n. 
  1. a chain, strap, etc., for controlling or leading a dog or other animal;
    lead.
  2. check;
    curb;
    restraint:to keep one's temper in leash; a tight leash on one's subordinates.
  3. [Hunting.]a brace and a half, as of foxes or hounds.

v.t. 
  1. to secure, control, or restrain by or as if by a leash:to leash water power for industrial use.
  2. to bind together by or as if by a leash;
    connect;
    link;
    associate.
Etymology:
  • Old French laisse. See lease1
  • Middle English lesh, variant of lece, lese 1250–1300


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

leash /liːʃ/ n
  1. a line or rope used to walk or control a dog or other animal; lead
  2. something resembling this in function: he kept a tight leash on his emotions
  3. straining at the leasheagerly impatient to begin something
vb
  1. (transitive) to control or secure by or as if by a leash
Etymology: 13th Century: from Old French laisse, from laissier to loose (hence, to let a dog run on a leash), ultimately from Latin laxus lax



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