mooring

Listen:
 /ˈmʊərɪŋ/


For the verb: "to moor"

Present Participle: mooring

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
moor•ing /ˈmʊrɪŋ/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. NauticalUsually,  moorings. [plural] the means by which a ship, boat, or aircraft is moored:Ships were torn from their moorings.
  2. Nauticalmoorings, [plural] a place where a ship, boat, or aircraft may be moored:The safest moorings were on the mainland.
  3. Usually,  moorings. a source of stability or security:Would he lose his moorings if he began to doubt his religion?

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
moor•ing  (mŏŏring),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. the act of a person or thing that moors.
  2. NauticalUsually,  moorings. the means by which a ship, boat, or aircraft is moored.
  3. Nauticalmoorings, a place where a ship, boat, or aircraft may be moored.
  4. Usually,  moorings. one's stability or security:After the death of his wife he lost his moorings.
  • 1375–1425; late Middle English; compare Middle Dutch moor; see moor2, -ing1

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
moor1 /mʊr/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Geographyan area of open wasteland, often overgrown with grass and heath.

moor2 /mʊr/USA pronunciation   v. 
  1. to hold and attach (a ship, etc.) in a particular place, as by ropes or anchors: [+ object]The crew moored the ship to the dock.[no object]We moored next to the dock.
  2. [+ object] to attach firmly;
    secure.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
moor1  (mŏŏr),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Geographya tract of open, peaty, wasteland, often overgrown with heath, common in high latitudes and altitudes where drainage is poor;
    heath.
  2. a tract of land preserved for game.
moory, adj. 
  • bef. 900; Middle English more, Old English mōr; cognate with Dutch moer, German Moor marsh

moor2  (mŏŏr),USA pronunciation v.t. 
  1. to secure (a ship, boat, dirigible, etc.) in a particular place, as by cables and anchors or by lines.
  2. to fix firmly;
    secure.

v.i. 
  1. to moor a ship, small boat, etc.
  2. to be made secure by cables or the like.

n. 
  1. the act of mooring.
  • 1485–95; earlier more, akin to Old English mǣrels- in mǣrelsrāp rope for mooring a ship; see marline

Moor  (mŏŏr),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. a Muslim of the mixed Berber and Arab people inhabiting NW Africa.
  2. a member of this group that invaded Spain in the 8th century a.d. and occupied it until 1492.
  • Greek Maûros
  • Latin Maurus
  • Middle French, variant of Maure
  • Middle English More 1350–1400


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

mooring /ˈmʊərɪŋ ˈmɔː-/ n
  1. a place for mooring a vessel
  2. a permanent anchor, dropped in the water and equipped with a floating buoy, to which vessels can moor



moor /mʊə; mɔː/ n
  1. a tract of unenclosed ground, usually having peaty soil covered with heather, coarse grass, bracken, and moss
Etymology: Old English mōr; related to Old Saxon mōr, Old High German muor swamp

ˈmoory adj
moor /mʊə; mɔː/ vb
  1. to secure (a ship, boat, etc) with cables or ropes
  2. (of a ship, boat, etc) to be secured in this way
  3. (not in technical usage) a less common word for anchor
Etymology: 15th Century: of Germanic origin; related to Old English mǣrelsrāp rope for mooring



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