WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
naught or nought /nɔt/USA pronunciation   n. [uncountable]
  1. nothing.
  2. a cipher (0);
    zero:a score of ten to naught.
Idioms
  1. Idiomscome to naught, [no object] to end in failure:His plans came to naught.


WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
naught  (nôt),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. nothing.
  2. a cipher (0);
    zero.
  3. Idiomscome to naught, to come to nothing;
    be without result or fruition;
    fail.
  4. Idiomsset at naught, to regard or treat as of no importance;
    disdain:He entered a milieu that set his ideals at naught.

adj. 
  1. lost;
    ruined.
  2. [Archaic.]worthless;
    useless.
  3. [Obs.]morally bad;
    wicked.

adv. 
  1. [Obs.]not.
Also,  nought. 
  • bef. 900; Middle English; Old English nauht, nāwiht ( no1 + wiht thing). See nought, wight1, whit


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

naught /nɔːt/ n
  1. archaic or literary nothing or nothingness; ruin or failure
  2. a variant spelling (esp US) of nought
  3. set at naughtto have disregard or scorn for; disdain
adv
  1. archaic or literary not at all: it matters naught
adj
  1. obsolete worthless, ruined, or wicked
Etymology: Old English nāwiht, from no1 + wiht thing, person; see wight1, whit



'naught' also found in these entries:
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