out

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 [ˈaʊt]



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
out /aʊt/USA pronunciation   adv. 
  1. not in the usual place, position, state, etc.:Those books are out of alphabetical order.
  2. away from one's home, country, work, etc., as specified:to go out of town.
  3. in or into the outdoors:to go out for a walk; Take the dog out.
  4. to a state of exhaustion;
    to a condition in which everything is totally used up:to pump a well out.
  5. to the end or conclusion, a final decision, etc.:to say it all out.
  6. to a point or state of dying out or fading away:That practice is on the way out.
  7. not burning or lit:The lights went out. Put that cigarette out.
  8. in or into a state of neglect, disuse, etc.:That style is out.
  9. so as not to be in the normal or proper position or state;
    out of joint:Her back went out after her fall.
  10. in or into public notice or knowledge:Her story has come out at last.
  11. so as to extend or project:Let's stretch out on the grass. A nail was sticking out.
  12. from a certain source or material:made out of scraps.
  13. so as to deprive or be deprived:to be cheated out of one's money.
  14. aloud or loudly:to cry out.
  15. thoroughly;
    completely;
    entirely:The children tired me out. Clean out the room.
  16. so as to make impossible to see, read, or understand:to cross out a misspelling.

adj. 
  1. not at one's home or place of employment;
    absent:[be + ~]will be out all week.
  2. not open to consideration:[be + ~]She gets airsick, so flying is out.
  3. wanting;
    lacking;
    without:[be + ~]We had some tickets but now we're out.
  4. removed from or not in effective operation, play, etc.:[be + ~]He's out for the season with a leg injury.
  5. no longer holding a job, public office, etc.;
    unemployed:[be + ~ + of + object]to be out of work.
  6. no longer working or operating;
    extinguished:[be + ~]Are the lights out?
  7. finished;
    ended:[be + ~]before the week is out.
  8. not currently fashionable or in style:[be + ~]Fitted waistlines are out this season.
  9. unconscious;
    senseless:[be + ~]A few drinks and he's out.
  10. Governmentnot in power, authority, or the like:a member of the out party.
  11. Sport[Baseball.]
    • [be + ~] (of a batter) not succeeding in getting or staying on base:Two men are out but the bases are loaded.
  12. [be + ~] outside of official limits or the prescribed area, as in the playing of a game on a marked court or field;
    out of bounds.
  13. Business having a financial loss to an indicated extent:[be + ~]They were out millions.
  14. not correct or accurate:[be + ~]The builder's estimate was out by ten thousand dollars.
  15. located at a distance;
    outlying:[before a noun]the out islands.
  16. Slang Termspublicly acknowledged:an out lesbian.

prep. 
  1. (used to indicate movement or direction from the inside to the outside of something):She ran out the door.
  2. (used to indicate location):The car is out back.
  3. (used to indicate movement away from a central point):Let's drive out the old parkway.

interj. 
  1. begone! Go away!:Out! And don't come back!
  2. Radio and Television(used in radio communications to signal that the sender has finished the message and is not expecting a reply). Compare over (def. 32).

n. [countable]
  1. a means of escape from responsibility, embarrassment, argument, confrontation, etc.:If we just give him an out, maybe he'll resign.
  2. GovernmentUsually,  outs. [plural] persons or groups not in office or lacking status, power, or authority.
  3. Sport[Baseball.]
    • an instance of putting out a batter or base runner.

v. [no object]
  1. to come out;
    become public:The truth will out.
Idioms
  1. Idiomsall out, with the highest or greatest effort:They went all out to finish by Friday.
  2. Idiomson the outs, in a state of disagreement;
    quarreling;
    at odds.
  3. Idiomsout for, [be + ~ + object] strongly or eagerly determined to acquire, achieve, etc.:He was out for money.
  4. Idiomsout from under, [be + ~ (+ object)] no longer having burdens or responsibilities, esp. free of debt.
  5. out of, [+ object]
    • Idiomsnot within:They ran out of the house.
    • Idiomsbeyond the reach of:out of sight.
    • Idiomsnot in a condition of:out of danger.
    • Idiomswithout;
      lacking:We're out of milk.
    • Idiomsfrom within or among:Take the jokers out of the pack of cards.
    • Idiomsbecause of;
      owing to:They did that out of spite.
    • Idiomsmade of;
      constructed from:a kite made out of string, paper, and glue.
  6. Idioms, Informal Termsout of it, [Informal.][usually: be + ~]
    • Idiomsnot participating:I'm out of it these days; tell me what's been going on.
    • Idiomsnot conscious:The sedative worked; he's out of it.
    • confused;
      muddled:too out of it to remember his own name.
  7. Idiomsout of place: 
    • Idiomsnot in the correct position or order.
    • Idiomsnot suitable to the circumstances or surroundings:behavior out of place in church.


out-, prefix. 
  • out- is attached to verbs and means "going beyond, surpassing, or outdoing (the action of the verb)'': out- + bid → outbid;out- + do → outdo;out- + last → outlast.
  • out- is also attached to nouns to form certain compounds, and means "outside;
    out'': out- + cast → outcast;
    out- + come → outcome;
    out- + side → outside.

  • WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    out  (out),USA pronunciation adv. 
    1. away from, or not in, the normal or usual place, position, state, etc.:out of alphabetical order; to go out to dinner.
    2. away from one's home, country, work, etc., as specified:to go out of town.
    3. in or into the outdoors:to go out for a walk.
    4. to a state of exhaustion, extinction, or depletion:to pump a well out.
    5. to the end or conclusion;
      to a final decision or resolution:to say it all out.
    6. to a point or state of extinction, nonexistence, etc.:to blow out the candle; a practice on the way out.
    7. in or into a state of neglect, disuse, etc.;
      not in current vogue or fashion:That style has gone out.
    8. so as not to be in the normal or proper position or state;
      out of joint:His back went out after his fall.
    9. in or into public notice or knowledge:The truth is out at last.
    10. seeking openly and energetically to do or have:to be out for a good time.
    11. not in present possession or use, as on loan:The librarian said that the book was still out.
    12. on strike:The miners go out at midnight.
    13. so as to project or extend:to stretch out; stick your tongue out.
    14. in or into activity, existence, or outward manifestation:A rash came out on her arm.
    15. from a specified source or material:made out of scraps.
    16. from a state of composure, satisfaction, or harmony:to be put out over trifles.
    17. in or into a state of confusion, vexation, dispute, variance, or unfriendliness:to fall out about trifles.
    18. so as to deprive or be deprived:to be cheated out of one's money.
    19. so as to use the last part of:to run out of gas.
    20. from a number, stock, or store:to point out the errors.
    21. aloud or loudly:to cry out.
    22. with completeness or effectiveness:to fill out.
    23. thoroughly;
      completely;
      entirely:The children tired me out.
    24. so as to obliterate or make undecipherable:to cross out a misspelling; to ink out.
    25. Idiomsall out, with maximum effort;
      thoroughly or wholeheartedly:They went all out to finish by Friday.
    26. Idiomsout and away, to a surpassing extent;
      far and away;
      by far:It was out and away the best apple pie she had ever eaten.
    27. Idiomsout for, aggressively determined to acquire, achieve, etc.:He's out for all the money he can get.
    28. Idiomsout from under, out of a difficult situation, esp. of debts or other obligations:The work piled up while I was away and I don't know how I'll ever get out from under.
    29. out of: 
      • Idiomsnot within:out of the house.
      • Idiomsbeyond the reach of:The boat's passengers had sailed out of hearing.
      • Idiomsnot in a condition of:out of danger.
      • Idiomsso as to deprive or be deprived of.
      • Idiomsfrom within or among:Take the jokers out of the pack.
      • Idiomsbecause of;
        owing to:out of loyalty.
      • Idiomsfoaled by (a dam):Grey Dancer out of Lady Grey.
    30. Idioms, Informal Termsout of it, [Informal.]
      • not part of or acceptable within an activity, social group, or fashion:She felt out of it because none of her friends were at the party.
      • not conscious;
        drunk or heavily drugged.
      • not alert or clearheaded;
        confused;
        muddled.
      • eliminated from contention:If our team loses two more games, we'll be out of it.
    31. out of sight. See  sight (def. 19).
    32. Nauticalout of trim, (of a ship) drawing excessively at the bow or stern.

    adj. 
    1. not at one's home or place of employment;
      absent:I stopped by to visit you last night, but you were out.
    2. not open to consideration;
      out of the question:I wanted to go by plane, but all the flights are booked, so that's out.
    3. wanting;
      lacking;
      without:We had some but now we're out.
    4. removed from or not in effective operation, play, a turn at bat, or the like, as in a game:He's out for the season because of an injury.
    5. no longer having or holding a job, public office, etc.;
      unemployed;
      disengaged (usually fol. by of ):to be out of work.
    6. inoperative;
      extinguished:The elevator is out. Are the lights out?
    7. finished;
      ended:before the week is out.
    8. not currently stylish, fashionable, or in vogue:Fitted waistlines are out this season.
    9. unconscious;
      senseless:Two drinks and he's usually out.
    10. Governmentnot in power, authority, or the like:a member of the out party.
    11. Sport[Baseball.]
      • (of a batter) not succeeding in getting on base:He was out at first on an attempted bunt.
      • (of a base runner) not successful in an attempt to advance a base or bases:He was out in attempting to steal second base.
    12. beyond fixed or regular limits;
      out of bounds:The ball was out.
    13. Businesshaving a pecuniary loss or expense to an indicated extent:The company will be out millions of dollars if the new factory doesn't open on schedule.
    14. incorrect or inaccurate:His calculations are out.
    15. not in practice;
      unskillful from lack of practice:Your bow hand is out.
    16. beyond the usual range, size, weight, etc. (often used in combination):an outsize bed.
    17. exposed;
      made bare, as by holes in one's clothing:out at the knees.
    18. at variance;
      at odds;
      unfriendly:They are out with each other.
    19. moving or directed outward;
      outgoing:the out train.
    20. not available, plentiful, etc.:Mums are out till next fall.
    21. external;
      exterior;
      outer.
    22. located at a distance;
      outlying:We sailed to six of the out islands.
    23. Sport[Cricket.]not having its innings:the out side.
    24. Sportof or pertaining to the playing of the first nine holes of an 18-hole golf course (opposed to in):His out score on the second round was 33.

    prep. 
    1. (used to indicate movement or direction from the inside to the outside of something):He looked out the window. She ran out the door.
    2. (used to indicate location):The car is parked out back.
    3. (used to indicate movement away from a central point):Let's drive out the old parkway.

    interj. 
    1. begone! away!
    2. Radio and Television(used in radio communications to signify that the sender has finished the message and is not expecting or prepared to receive a reply.) Cf.  over (def. 61).
    3. [Archaic.](an exclamation of abhorrence, indignation, reproach, or grief (usually fol. by upon):Out upon you!

    n. 
    1. a means of escape or excuse, as from a place, punishment, retribution, responsibility, etc.:He always left himself an out.
    2. Governmenta person who lacks status, power, or authority, esp. in relation to a particular group or situation.
    3. GovernmentUsually,  outs. persons not in office or political power (distinguished from ins).
    4. Sport[Baseball.]a put-out.
    5. Sport(in tennis, squash, handball, etc.) a return or service that does not land within the in-bounds limits of a court or section of a court (opposed to in).
    6. something that is out, as a projecting corner.
    7. [Print.]
      • the omission of a word or words.
      • the word or words omitted.
    8. British Terms[Northern Brit. Dial.]an outing.
    9. Informal Terms, Idiomsbe on the or  at outs with, to be estranged from (another person);
      be unfriendly or on bad terms with:He is on the outs with his brother.

    v.i. 
    1. to go or come out.
    2. to become public, evident, known, etc.:The truth will out.
    3. to make known;
      tell;
      utter (fol. by with):Out with the truth!

    v.t. 
    1. to eject or expel;
      discharge;
      oust.
    2. to intentionally expose (a secret homosexual, esp. a public figure).
    • bef. 900; (adverb, adverbial) Middle English; Old English ūt; cognate with Dutch uit, German aus, Old Norse, Gothic ūt; akin to Sanskrit ud-; (adjective, adjectival, interjection, and preposition) Middle English, from the adverb, adverbial; (verb, verbal) Middle English outen, Old English ūtian to put out, cognate with Old Frisian ūtia

    out-, 
  • a prefixal use of  out, adv., occurring in various senses in compounds (outcast, outcome, outside), and serving also to form many transitive verbs denoting a going beyond, surpassing, or outdoing in the particular action indicated (outbid, outdo, outgeneral, outlast, outstay, outrate).
    • Middle English; Old English ūt-; see out

    out, +v.t. 
  • to intentionally expose (a secret homosexual, a spy, etc.).

  • WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
    breeze /briz/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  breezed, breez•ing. 
    n. [countable]
    1. Meteorologya wind or current of air, esp. a light one:A gentle breeze blew through the curtains.
    2. Informal Terms an easy task:[usually singular]That quiz was a breeze.

    v. 
    1. to move in a carefree and confident manner:[+ into/in + object]He breezed into the classroom and sat down.
    2. Informal Terms breeze through, [+ through + object] to complete (work, etc.) quickly and easily:We breezed through the test and were out of there an hour early.
    Idioms
    1. Slang Terms, Idiomsshoot or bat the breeze, Slang. to talk aimlessly;
      chat:two old men sitting on the porch and shooting the breeze.


    WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
    breeze1  (brēz),USA pronunciation n., v.,  breezed, breez•ing. 
    n. 
    1. Meteorologya wind or current of air, esp. a light or moderate one.
    2. Meteorologya wind of 4–31 mph (2–14 m/sec).
    3. Informal Termsan easy task;
      something done or carried on without difficulty:Finding people to join in the adventure was a breeze.
    4. British Terms[Chiefly Brit. Informal.]a disturbance or quarrel.
    5. shoot or  bat the breeze, [Slang.]
      • to converse aimlessly;
        chat.
      • to talk nonsense or exaggerate the truth:He likes to shoot the breeze, so don't take everything he says seriously.

    v.i. 
    1. (of the wind) to blow a breeze (usually used impersonally with it as subject):It breezed from the west all day.
    2. to move in a self-confident or jaunty manner:She breezed up to the police officer and asked for directions.
    3. Informal Termsto proceed quickly and easily;
      move rapidly without intense effort (often fol. by along, into, or through):He breezed through the task. The car breezed along the highway.

    v.t. 
    1. to cause to move in an easy or effortless manner, esp. at less than full speed:The boy breezed the horse around the track.
    2. breeze in, [Slang.]
      • to win effortlessly:He breezed in with an election plurality of 200,000.
      • Also,  breeze into or  out. to move or act with a casual or careless attitude:He breezed out without paying attention to anyone.
    3. breeze up, Atlantic States. to become windy.
    breezeless, adj. 
    breezelike′, adj. 
    • 1555–65; earlier brize, brise north or northeast wind; compare Dutch bries, East Frisian brîse, French brize, Spanish, Portuguese, Catalan brisa, Italian brezza; origin, originally and path of transmission disputed
      • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged See  wind1. 

    breeze2  (brēz),USA pronunciation n. 
    1. Energycinders, ash, or dust from coal, coke, or charcoal.
    2. Energyconcrete, brick, or cinder block in which such materials form a component.
    • French braise live coals, cinders; see braze2
    • variant of dialect, dialectal brays 1720–30


    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

    out /aʊt/ adv
    1. (often used as a particle) at or to a point beyond the limits of some location; outside: get out at once
    2. (particle) out of consciousness: she passed out at the sight of blood
    3. (particle) used to indicate a burst of activity as indicated by the verb: fever broke out
    4. (particle) used to indicate obliteration of an object: the graffiti were painted out
    5. (particle) used to indicate an approximate drawing or description: sketch out, chalk out
    6. public; revealed: the secret is out
    7. on sale or on view to the public: the book is being brought out next May
    8. (of a young woman) in or into polite society: Lucinda had a fabulous party when she came out
    9. (of the sun, stars, etc) visible
    10. (of a jury) withdrawn to consider a verdict in private
    11. (particle) used to indicate exhaustion or extinction: the sugar's run out, put the light out
    12. (particle) used to indicate a goal or object achieved at the end of the action specified by the verb: he worked it out, let's fight it out, then!
    13. (preceded by a superlative) existing: the friendliest dog out
    14. an expression in signalling, radio, etc, to indicate the end of a transmission
    15. out ofat or to a point outside: out of his reach
    16. away from; not in: stepping out of line, out of focus
    17. because of, motivated by: doing it out of jealousy
    18. from (a material or source): made out of plastic
    19. not or no longer having any of (a substance, material, etc): we're out of sugar
    adj (postpositive)
    1. not or not any longer worth considering: that plan is out because of the weather
    2. not allowed: smoking on duty is out
    3. (also prenominal) not in vogue; unfashionable: that sort of dress is out these days
    4. (of a fire or light) no longer burning or providing illumination
    5. not working: the radio's out
    6. not in; not at home
    7. desirous of or intent on (something or doing something): I'm out for as much money as I can get
    8. Also: out on strike on strike
    9. (in several games and sports) denoting the state in which a player is caused to discontinue active participation, esp in some specified role
    10. used up; exhausted: our supplies are completely out
    11. worn into holes: this sweater is out at the elbows
    12. inaccurate, deficient, or discrepant: out by six pence
    13. not in office or authority
    14. completed or concluded, as of time: before the year is out
    15. in flower: the roses are out now
    16. informal not concealing one's homosexuality
    prep
    1. out of; out through: he ran out the door
    interj
    1. an exclamation, usually peremptory, of dismissal, reproach, etc
    2. (in wireless telegraphy) an expression used to signal that the speaker is signing off
    3. out with ita command to make something known immediately, without missing any details
    n
    1. chiefly US a method of escape from a place, difficult situation, punishment, etc
    2. an instance of the putting out of a batter; putout
    vb
    1. (transitive) to put or throw out
    2. (intransitive) to be made known or effective despite efforts to the contrary (esp in the phrase will out): the truth will out
    3. (transitive) informal (of homosexuals) to expose (a public figure) as being a fellow homosexual
    4. (transitive) informal to expose something secret, embarrassing, or unknown about (a person): he was eventually outed as a talented goal scorer
    Etymology: Old English ūt; related to Old Saxon, Old Norse ūt, Old High German ūz, German aus
    USAGE
    The use of out as a preposition, though common in American English, is regarded as incorrect in British English: he climbed out of (not out) a window; he went out through the door




    out- prefix
    1. excelling or surpassing in a particular action: outlast, outlive
    2. indicating an external location or situation away from the centre: outpost, outpatient
    3. indicating emergence, an issuing forth, etc: outcrop, outgrowth
    4. indicating the result of an action: outcome



    'out' also found in these entries:
    Collocations: out him as a [cheater, crook, fraud, fake], the ins and outs of [English, mechanics, politics, their marriage], the new [book, movie] is out [soon, now], more...

    Forum discussions with the word(s) "out" in the title:


    Look up "out" at Merriam-Webster
    Look up "out" at dictionary.com

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