WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
pa•tron /ˈpeɪtrən/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. one who is a customer, esp. a regular one, of a store, etc.:Patrons must leave the hotel by 3:00 p.m.
  2. one who supports an artist, charity, etc., with money, etc.:a patron of the arts.
See -patr-.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
pa•tron  (pātrən),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. a person who is a customer, client, or paying guest, esp. a regular one, of a store, hotel, or the like.
  2. a person who supports with money, gifts, efforts, or endorsement an artist, writer, museum, cause, charity, institution, special event, or the like:a patron of the arts; patrons of the annual Democratic dance.
  3. a person whose support or protection is solicited or acknowledged by the dedication of a book or other work.
  4. ReligionSee  patron saint. 
  5. Ancient HistoryRom. Hist. the protector of a dependent or client, often the former master of a freedman still retaining certain rights over him.
  6. Religion[Eccles.]a person who has the right of presenting a member of the clergy to a benefice.
patron•al, patron•ly, adj. 
patron•dom, patron•ship′, n. 
patron•less, adj. 
  • Medieval Latin, Latin patrōnus legal protector, advocate (Medieval Latin: lord, master), der. of pater father. See pattern
  • Middle English 1250–1300

pa•trón  (pä trôn)USA pronunciation n., pl. -tron•es(-trônes).USA pronunciation  Spanish.
  1. Foreign Terms(in Mexico and the southwestern U.S.) a boss;
    employer.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

patron /ˈpeɪtrən/ n
  1. a person, esp a man, who sponsors or aids artists, charities, etc; protector or benefactor
  2. a customer of a shop, hotel, etc, esp a regular one
  3. See patron saint
Etymology: 14th Century: via Old French from Latin patrōnus protector, from pater father
patron French: /patrɔ̃/ n
  1. a man, who owns or manages a hotel, restaurant, or bar



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