WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
pre•cip•i•tate /v. prɪˈsɪpɪˌteɪt; adj., n. -tɪt, -ˌteɪt/USA pronunciation   v.,  -tat•ed, -tat•ing, adj., n. 
v. 
  1. to speed up (an event);
    to bring about too soon:[+ object]to precipitate a crisis.
  2. to join in suddenly:[+ object]to precipitate oneself into a struggle.
  3. Chemistry[+ object] to separate (a substance) in solid form from a solution.
  4. Meteorology[no object] to fall to the earth's surface as a form of water;
    to rain, snow, etc.

adj. 
  1. done or made without enough thought or planning ahead of time;
    too sudden:a precipitate marriage.
  2. proceeding with great haste:a precipitate retreat.

n. [uncountable]
  1. Chemistrya substance precipitated from a solution.
  2. Meteorologymoisture in the form of rain, snow, etc.
pre•cip•i•tate•ly, adv. 

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
pre•cip•i•tate  (v. pri sipi tāt′;adj., n. pri sipi tit, -tāt′),USA pronunciation v.,  -tat•ed, -tat•ing, adj., n. 
v.t. 
  1. to hasten the occurrence of;
    bring about prematurely, hastily, or suddenly:to precipitate an international crisis.
  2. to cast down headlong;
    fling or hurl down.
  3. to cast, plunge, or send, esp. violently or abruptly:He precipitated himself into the struggle.
  4. Chemistryto separate (a substance) in solid form from a solution, as by means of a reagent.

v.i. 
  1. Meteorologyto fall to the earth's surface as a condensed form of water;
    to rain, snow, hail, drizzle, etc.
  2. Chemistryto separate from a solution as a precipitate.
  3. to be cast or thrown down headlong.

adj. 
  1. headlong:a precipitate fall down the stairs.
  2. rushing headlong or rapidly onward.
  3. proceeding rapidly or with great haste:a precipitate retreat.
  4. exceedingly sudden or abrupt:a precipitate stop; a precipitate decision.
  5. done or made without sufficient deliberation;
    overhasty;
    rash:a precipitate marriage.

n. 
  1. Chemistrya substance precipitated from a solution.
  2. Meteorologymoisture condensed in the form of rain, snow, etc.
pre•cipi•tate•ly, adv. 
pre•cipi•tate•ness, n. 
pre•cipi•ta′tive, adj. 
pre•cipi•ta′tor, n. 
  • Neo-Latin praecipitātum a precipitate, noun, nominal use of neuter of praecipitātus
  • Latin praecipitātus (past participle of praecipitāre to cast down headlong), equivalent. to praecipit- (stem of praeceps steep; see precipice) + -ātus -ate1; (noun, nominal)
  • (verb, verbal and adjective, adjectival) 1520–30
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged accelerate.
    • 4.See corresponding entry in Unabridged crystallize.
    • 12.See corresponding entry in Unabridged reckless, impetuous.
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged retard.
    • 12.See corresponding entry in Unabridged careful.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

precipitate vb /prɪˈsɪpɪˌteɪt/
  1. (transitive) to cause to happen too soon or sooner than expected; bring on
  2. to throw or fall from or as from a height
  3. to cause (moisture) to condense and fall as snow, rain, etc, or (of moisture, rain, etc) to condense and fall thus
  4. to undergo or cause to undergo a process in which a dissolved substance separates from solution as a fine suspension of solid particles
adj /prɪˈsɪpɪtɪt/
  1. rushing ahead
  2. done rashly or with undue haste
  3. sudden and brief
n /prɪˈsɪpɪtɪt/
  1. a precipitated solid in its suspended form or after settling or filtering
Etymology: 16th Century: from Latin praecipitāre to throw down headlong, from praeceps headlong, steep, from prae before, in front + caput head

preˈcipitable adj preˌcipitaˈbility n preˈcipitately adv preˈcipiˌtator n



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