relaxed

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 [rɪˈlækst]



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
re•laxed /rɪˈlækst/USA pronunciation  adj. 
  1. not worried;
    relieved from tension;
    loosened and no longer tight.
See -lax-.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
re•laxed  (ri lakst),USA pronunciation adj. 
  1. being free of or relieved from tension or anxiety:in a relaxed mood.
  2. not strict; easy;
    informal:the relaxed rules of the club.
[1630–40;
relax + -ed2]
re•lax•ed•ly  (ri laksid lē, -lakstlē),USA pronunciation adv.  re•laxed•ness, n. 

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
re•lax /rɪˈlæks/USA pronunciation   v. 
  1. to (cause to) be made less tense, rigid, or firm: [+ object]a drug to relax the muscles.[no object]Her muscles relaxed during sleep.
  2. to make less strict or severe:[+ object]I can't relax the rules for anyone in the class.
  3. to enjoy or bring relief from the effects of tension, anxiety, etc.: [no object]Come in, sit down and relax.[+ object]Maybe the quiet music will relax you.
re•lax•er, n. [countable]See -lax-.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
re•lax  (ri laks),USA pronunciation v.t. 
  1. to make less tense, rigid, or firm; make lax:to relax the muscles.
  2. to diminish the force of.
  3. to slacken or abate, as effort, attention, etc.
  4. to make less strict or severe, as rules, discipline, etc.:to relax the requirements for a license.
  5. to release or bring relief from the effects of tension, anxiety, etc.:A short swim always relaxes me.

v.i. 
  1. to become less tense, rigid, or firm.
  2. to become less strict or severe;
    grow milder.
  3. to reduce or stop work, effort, application, etc., esp. for the sake of rest or recreation.
  4. to release oneself from inhibition, worry, tension, etc.
re•laxa•tive, re•lax•a•tory  (ri laksə tôr′ē, -tōr′ē),USA pronunciation adj.  re•laxer, n. 
  • Latin relaxāre to stretch out again, loosen, equivalent. to re- re- + laxāre to loosen, derivative of laxus slack, lax
  • Middle English relaxen 1350–1400
    • 1, 6.See corresponding entry in Unabridged loosen, slacken.
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged mitigate, weaken, lessen, reduce.
    • 4.See corresponding entry in Unabridged ease.
    • 6.See corresponding entry in Unabridged unbend.
    • 7.See corresponding entry in Unabridged relent, soften.
    • 1, 6.See corresponding entry in Unabridged tighten, tense.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

relax /rɪˈlæks/ vb
  1. to make (muscles, a grip, etc) less tense or rigid or (of muscles, a grip, etc) to become looser or less rigid
  2. (intransitive) to take rest or recreation, as from work or effort
  3. to lessen the force of (effort, concentration, etc) or (of effort) to become diminished
  4. to make (rules or discipline) less rigid or strict or (of rules, etc) to diminish in severity
  5. (intransitive) (of a person) to become less formal; unbend
Etymology: 15th Century: from Latin relaxāre to loosen, from re- + laxāre to loosen, from laxus loose, lax

reˈlaxed adj relaxedly /rɪˈlæksɪdlɪ/ adv



'relaxed' also found in these entries:
Collocations: a relaxed [child, woman, man, person, mother, father, parent], her [jaw, mouth, arm] was not relaxed, relaxed muscles, more...

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