WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
splin•ter /ˈsplɪntɚ/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Pathologya small, thin, sharp piece of wood, bone, etc., split off from the main body:He used a needle to remove the splinter from his finger.
  2. a part of an organization that breaks off from the main group:A splinter group broke away from the radical party.

v. 
  1. to (cause to) be split into splinters: [no object]The wooden guard rail splintered as the truck drove through it.[+ object]The huge truck splintered the flimsy guard rail.
  2. to split (a larger group) into separate factions: [+ object]These divisions will splinter the Republican Party.[no object]One group after another splintered away from the Democratic Party.
splin•ter•y, adj. 

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
splin•ter  (splintər),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. Pathologya small, thin, sharp piece of wood, bone, or the like, split or broken off from the main body.
  2. See  splinter group. 

v.t. 
  1. to split or break into splinters.
  2. to break off (something) in splinters.
  3. to split or break (a larger group) into separate factions or independent groups.
  4. [Obs.]to secure or support by a splint or splints, as a broken limb.

v.i. 
  1. to be split or broken into splinters.
  2. to break off in splinters.
splinter•less, adj. 
splinter•y, adj. 
  • Middle Dutch or Middle Low German; compare splint
  • Middle English 1350–1400
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged sliver.
    • 8.See corresponding entry in Unabridged separate, part, split.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

splinter /ˈsplɪntə/ n
  1. a very small sharp piece of wood, glass, metal, etc, characteristically long and thin, broken off from a whole
  2. a metal fragment, from the container of a shell, bomb, etc, thrown out during an explosion
vb
  1. to reduce or be reduced to sharp fragments; shatter
  2. to break or be broken off in small sharp fragments
Etymology: 14th Century: from Middle Dutch splinter; see splint



'splinter' also found in these entries:
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