sting

Listen:
 /stɪŋ/


For the verb: "to sting"

Simple Past: stung
Past Participle: stung

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2017
sting /stɪŋ/USA pronunciation   v.,  stung/stʌŋ/USA pronunciation  sting•ing, n. 
v. 
  1. Zoologyto prick or wound (a person or animal) with a sharp-pointed part of the body that often contains poison or venom: [+ object]The bee stung her on the foot.[no object]Dogs bite and bees sting.
  2. to affect painfully as a result of contact, as certain plants do: [no object]That plant will sting if you touch it.[+ object]The nettle stung him.
  3. to cause to feel a sharp pain: [+ object]The bullet stung his arm as it grazed his shoulder.[no object]His eyes stung from the smoke.
  4. to cause (someone) to feel anger, resentment, insult, etc.: [+ object]Those remarks stung her deeply.[no object]The memory of that insult still stings.
  5. to provoke (someone) to do some action: [+ object + to + verb]Those insulting remarks stung her to reply sharply.[+ object + into/to + object]He was finally stung into action.
  6. Slang Termsto cheat or take advantage of, esp. to overcharge;
    soak:[+ object]The swindlers stung me for over five thousand dollars.

n. [countable]
  1. Pathologyan act or instance of stinging.
  2. Pathologya wound or pain caused by stinging.
  3. any sharp physical or mental wound, hurt, or pain.
  4. Zoologya sharp-pointed part of the body of some insects or animals, often containing venom or poison.
  5. Slang Terms
    • a swindle or confidence game.
    • an apparently illegal action such as the buying of stolen goods, engaged in by undercover investigators to collect evidence of wrongdoing:an undercover sting filmed by hidden cameras.
sting•er, n. [countable]

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2017
sting (sting),USA pronunciation  v.,  stung  or ([Obs.]) stang;
stung;
sting•ing;
 n. 

v.t. 
  1. Zoologyto prick or wound with a sharp-pointed, often venom-bearing organ.
  2. to affect painfully or irritatingly as a result of contact, as certain plants do:to be stung by nettles.
  3. to cause to smart or to cause a sharp pain:The blowing sand stung his eyes.
  4. to cause mental or moral anguish:to be stung with remorse.
  5. to goad or drive, as by sharp irritation.
  6. Slang Termsto cheat or take advantage of, esp. to overcharge;
    soak.

v.i. 
  1. to use, have, or wound with a sting, as bees.
  2. to cause a sharp, smarting pain, as some plants, an acrid liquid or gas, or a slap or hit.
  3. to cause acute mental pain or irritation, as annoying thoughts or one's conscience:The memory of that insult still stings.
  4. to feel acute mental pain or irritation:He was stinging from the blow to his pride.
  5. to feel a smarting pain, as from a blow or the sting of an insect.

n. 
  1. Pathologyan act or an instance of stinging.
  2. Pathologya wound, pain, or smart caused by stinging.
  3. any sharp physical or mental wound, hurt, or pain.
  4. anything or an element in anything that wounds, pains, or irritates:to feel the sting of defeat; Death, where is thy sting?
  5. capacity to wound or pain:Satire has a sting.
  6. a sharp stimulus or incitement:driven by the sting of jealousy; the sting of ambition.
  7. Botanya glandular hair on certain plants, as nettles, that emits an irritating fluid.
  8. Zoologyany of various sharp-pointed, often venom-bearing organs of insects and other animals capable of inflicting painful or dangerous wounds.
  9. Slang Terms
    • See  confidence game. 
    • an ostensibly illegal operation, as the buying of stolen goods or the bribing of public officials, used by undercover investigators to collect evidence of wrongdoing.
stinging•ly, adv. 
stingless, adj. 
  • bef. 900; (verb, verbal) Middle English stingen, Old English stingan to pierce; cognate with Old Norse stinga to pierce, Gothic -stangan (in usstangan to pull out); (noun, nominal) Middle English sting(e), Old English: act of stinging, derivative of the verb, verbal


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

sting /stɪŋ/ vb (stings, stinging, stung)
  1. (of certain animals and plants) to inflict a wound on (an organism) by the injection of poison
  2. to feel or cause to feel a sharp mental or physical pain
  3. (transitive) to goad or incite (esp in the phrase sting into action)
  4. (transitive) informal to cheat, esp by overcharging
n
  1. a skin wound caused by the poison injected by certain insects or plants
  2. pain caused by or as if by the sting of a plant or animal
  3. a mental pain or pang: a sting of conscience
  4. a sharp pointed organ, such as the ovipositor of a wasp, by which poison can be injected into the prey
  5. the ability to sting: a sharp sting in his criticism
  6. something as painful or swift of action as a sting: the sting of death
  7. a sharp stimulus or incitement
  8. slang a swindle or fraud
  9. slang a trap set up by the police to entice a person to commit a crime and thereby produce evidence
  10. sting in the tailan unexpected and unpleasant ending
Etymology: Old English stingan; related to Old Norse stinga to pierce, Gothic usstangan to pluck out, Greek stakhus ear of corn

ˈstinging adj



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