stuff

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 [ˈstʌf]



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
stuff /stʌf/USA pronunciation   n. [uncountable]
  1. the material of which anything is made:Kerosene is oily black stuff.
  2. material, objects, or items of some kind not specified:What is all that stuff on the floor?
  3. property, such as personal belongings:I left some of my stuff in Dad's attic.
  4. inward character, qualities, or capabilities:The test pilots all believed they had the right stuff to be astronauts.
  5. Informal Termsbehavior or talk of a particular kind:That's kid stuff!
  6. a specialty or special skill:Get out there and do your stuff.
  7. worthless things or matter:a lot of stuff and nonsense.
  8. Slang Termsa drug, esp. an illegal one:Are you on the stuff again?

v. [+ object]
  1. to push, thrust, or cram (something) into something else:I stuffed my clothes into the suitcase.
  2. to fill (a receptacle, etc.), esp. by packing the contents closely together:He stuffed his suitcase with old clothes.
  3. to fill or cram with food:He was stuffing his face (= eating to excess) with cake and ice cream.
  4. Foodto fill (poultry, vegetables, etc.) with a stuffing:to stuff a turkey.
  5. to fill the preserved skin of (a dead animal) with material, retaining its natural form and appearance for display.
  6. Governmentto put false votes into (a ballot box).
  7. to pack (people) tightly in a (confined place);
    crowd together:They stuffed us into the subway car.
  8. to stop up;
    block or choke:[~ (+ up) + object]Those allergies stuffed (up) her nose until she took medicine.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
stuff  (stuf ),USA pronunciation  n. 
  1. the material of which anything is made:a hard, crystalline stuff.
  2. material to be worked upon or to be used in making something:wood, steel, and other stuff for building.
  3. material of some unspecified kind:a cushion filled with some soft stuff.
  4. British Terms, Textiles[Chiefly Brit.]woven material or fabric, esp. wool.
  5. property, as personal belongings or equipment;
    things.
  6. something to be swallowed, as food, drink, or medicine.
  7. inward character, qualities, or capabilities:to have good stuff in one.
  8. Informal Termsaction or talk of a particular kind:kid stuff; Cut out the rough stuff.
  9. worthless things or matter:to clean the stuff out of a closet.
  10. worthless or foolish ideas, talk, or writing:a lot of stuff and nonsense.
  11. Sport
    • [Baseball.]the assortment of pitches that a pitcher uses in a game together with the ability to deliver them in the proper manner at the right speed to the desired spot:He saved his best stuff for the tougher hitters in the lineup.
    • spin or speed imparted to a ball, as by a baseball pitcher, a bowler, or a tennis player:a pitch with plenty of stuff.
  12. Informal Termsjournalistic, literary, artistic, dramatic, musical, or other compositions or performances:Bach composed some splendid stuff.
  13. Informal Termsone's trade, skill, field, facts, etc.:She knows her stuff.
  14. Slang Termsany kind of drug, esp. an illicit one.
  15. PrintingAlso called  stock. [Papermaking.]refined and beaten wet pulp ready for spreading on the wire.

v.t. 
  1. to fill (a receptacle), esp. by packing the contents closely together;
    cram full.
  2. to fill (an aperture, cavity, etc.) by forcing something into it.
  3. to fill or line with some kind of material as a padding or packing.
  4. to fill or cram (oneself, one's stomach, etc.) with food.
  5. Foodto fill (meat, vegetables, etc.) with seasoned bread crumbs or other savory matter.
  6. to fill the preserved skin of (a dead animal) with material, retaining its natural form and appearance for display.
  7. Governmentto put fraudulent votes into (a ballot box).
  8. to thrust or cram (something) into a receptacle, cavity, or the like.
  9. to pack tightly in a confined place;
    crowd together.
  10. to crowd (a vehicle, room, etc.) with persons.
  11. to clutter or fill (the mind) with facts, details, etc.
  12. Clothing(in leather manufacturing) to treat (a skin, hide, etc.) with a composition of tallow and other ingredients.
  13. to stop up or plug;
    block or choke (usually fol. by up).

v.i. 
  1. to cram oneself with food;
    eat gluttonously;
    gorge.
stuffless, adj. 
  • Old French estoffe, derivative of the verb, verbal
  • Frankish *stopfōn, *stoppōn (see stop); (noun, nominal) Middle English
  • Old French estoffer literally, to stuff
  • (verb, verbal) late Middle English stuffen to equip, furnish 1300–50
    • 1, 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged
    • 3.See corresponding entry in Unabridged See  matter. 
    • 9.See corresponding entry in Unabridged waste, rubbish, trash.
    • 10.See corresponding entry in Unabridged nonsense, twaddle, claptrap, balderdash.
    • 23.See corresponding entry in Unabridged press, stow.
    • 28.See corresponding entry in Unabridged obstruct.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

stuff /stʌf/ vb (mainly tr)
  1. to pack or fill completely; cram
  2. (intransitive) to eat large quantities
  3. to force, shove, or squeeze: to stuff money into a pocket
  4. to fill (food such as poultry or tomatoes) with a stuffing
  5. to fill (an animal's skin) with material so as to restore the shape of the live animal
  6. slang to have sexual intercourse with (a woman)
  7. US Canadian to fill (a ballot box) with a large number of fraudulent votes
  8. slang to ruin, frustrate, or defeat
n
  1. the raw material or fabric of something
  2. woollen cloth or fabric
  3. any general or unspecified substance or accumulation of objects
  4. stupid or worthless actions, speech, ideas, etc
  5. subject matter, skill, etc: he knows his stuff
  6. a slang word for money
  7. slang a drug, esp cannabis
  8. Brit slang a girl or woman considered sexually (esp in the phrase bit of stuff)
  9. do one's stuffinformal to do what is expected of one
  10. that's the stuffthat is what is needed
Etymology: 14th Century: from Old French estoffe, from estoffer to furnish, provide, of Germanic origin; related to Middle High German stopfen to cram full

ˈstuffer n



'stuff' also found in these entries:
Collocations: stuff a [pillow, cushion, toy], [oily, expensive, dangerous, healthy, black] stuff, stuff a [pillow] with, more...

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