suffering

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 [ˈsʌfərɪŋ]


For the verb: "to suffer"

Present Participle: suffering

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
suf•fer•ing /ˈsʌfərɪŋ, ˈsʌfrɪŋ/USA pronunciation   n. 
  1. [uncountable] the state of a person or thing that suffers.
  2. Often,  sufferings. [plural] something suffered;
    pain:the sufferings of the slaves.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
suf•fer•ing  (sufər ing, sufring),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. the state of a person or thing that suffers.
  2. Often,  sufferings. something suffered by a person or a group of people;
    pain:the sufferings of the slaves.
suffer•ing•ly, adv. 
  • 1300–50; Middle English; see suffer, -ing1
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged . agony, torment, torture;
      pain, distress.

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
suf•fer /ˈsʌfɚ/USA pronunciation   v. 
  1. to feel pain or great distress: [no object]She suffered greatly as a child.[+ object]She suffered poverty as a child.
  2. to become worse;
    deteriorate:[no object]My work suffers when I'm distracted.
  3. to endure or be afflicted with something, such as a disease, injury, or loss: [no object]to suffer from Parkinson's disease.[+ object]He suffered a sprain in his left leg.
  4. to experience (any action, process, or condition):[+ object]to suffer change.
  5. to tolerate or allow:[+ object]I do not suffer fools gladly.
suf•fer•er, n. [countable]

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
suf•fer  (sufər),USA pronunciation v.i. 
  1. to undergo or feel pain or distress:The patient is still suffering.
  2. to sustain injury, disadvantage, or loss:One's health suffers from overwork. The business suffers from lack of capital.
  3. to undergo a penalty, as of death:The traitor was made to suffer on the gallows.
  4. to endure pain, disability, death, etc., patiently or willingly.

v.t. 
  1. to undergo, be subjected to, or endure (pain, distress, injury, loss, or anything unpleasant):to suffer the pangs of conscience.
  2. to undergo or experience (any action, process, or condition):to suffer change.
  3. to tolerate or allow:I do not suffer fools gladly.
suffer•a•ble, adj. 
suffer•a•ble•ness, n. 
suffer•a•bly, adv. 
suffer•er, n. 
  • Vulgar Latin *sufferīre
  • Latin sufferre, equivalent. to suf- suf- + ferre to bear1; compare Old French sofrir
  • Middle English suff(e)ren 1200–50
    • 5.See corresponding entry in Unabridged sustain.
    • 7.See corresponding entry in Unabridged stomach, stand, abide.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

suffering /ˈsʌfərɪŋ; ˈsʌfrɪŋ/ n
  1. the pain, misery, or loss experienced by a person who suffers
  2. the state or an instance of enduring pain, etc



suffer /ˈsʌfə/ vb
  1. to undergo or be subjected to (pain, punishment, etc)
  2. (transitive) to undergo or experience (anything): to suffer a change of management
  3. (intransitive) to be set at a disadvantage: this author suffers in translation
  4. (transitive) archaic to permit (someone to do something): suffer the little children to come unto me
  5. suffer fromto be ill with, esp recurrently
  6. to be given to: he suffers from a tendency to exaggerate
Etymology: 13th Century: from Old French soffrir, from Latin sufferre, from sub- + ferre to bear

ˈsufferer n



'suffering' also found in these entries:
Collocations: her long-suffering [husband], a suffering [husband, wife, parent, partner, child], he's not the suffering [kind, type, sort], more...

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Look up "suffering" at Merriam-Webster
Look up "suffering" at dictionary.com

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