WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
symp•tom /ˈsɪmptəm/USA pronunciation   n. [countable]
  1. Pathologya physical condition that arises from and accompanies a particular disorder and serves as an indication of it:The symptoms of this flu are aching joints, high fever, and stomach pains.
  2. any action, condition, or circumstance that arises from or accompanies something else and serves as evidence of it:the symptoms of economic inflation.
symp•to•mat•ic,/ˌsɪmptəˈmætɪk/USA pronunciation   adj. See sym-.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
symp•tom  (simptəm),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. any phenomenon or circumstance accompanying something and serving as evidence of it.
  2. a sign or indication of something.
  3. Pathologya phenomenon that arises from and accompanies a particular disease or disorder and serves as an indication of it.
  • Greek sýmptōma occurrence, that which falls together with something, equivalent. to sym- sym- + ptō- (variant stem of píptein to fall) + -ma noun, nominal suffix of result
  • Late Latin symptōma
  • Middle English 1350–1400
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged signal, token, mark.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

symptom /ˈsɪmptəm/ n
  1. any sensation or change in bodily function experienced by a patient that is associated with a particular disease
  2. any phenomenon or circumstance accompanying something and regarded as evidence of its existence; indication
Etymology: 16th Century: from Late Latin symptōma, from Greek sumptōma chance, from sumpiptein to occur, from syn- + piptein to fall



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