thaw

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 /θɔː/



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2015
thaw /θɔ/USA pronunciation   v. 
  1. [no object] to change from a frozen to a liquid state;
    melt: [no object]The meat thawed.[+ object]Use the microwave to thaw the meat.
  2. [no object; (~ + out)] to get relief from the cold:Sit by the fire and thaw out.
  3. Meteorology[no object] (of the weather) to become warm enough to melt ice and snow.
  4. to (cause to) become less hostile or aloof;
    to (cause to) become more friendly: [no object]Relations between the two countries thawed.[+ object]The glasses of vodka thawed the hostility between the two sides.

n. [countable]
  • the act or process of thawing.
  • a reduction or easing in tension or hostility.
  • Meteorology(in winter) weather warm enough to melt ice and snow.

  • WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2015
    thaw  (thô), 
    v.i. 
    1. to pass or change from a frozen to a liquid or semiliquid state;
      melt.
    2. to be freed from the physical effect of frost or extreme cold (sometimes fol. by out):Sit by the fire and thaw out.
    3. Meteorology(of the weather) to become warm enough to melt ice and snow:It will probably thaw today.
    4. to become less formal, reserved, or aloof:He thawed at their kindness.
    5. to become less hostile or tense:International relations thawed.

    v.t. 
  • to cause to change from a frozen to a liquid or semiliquid state; melt.
  • to free from the physical effect of frost or extreme cold;
    bring to a more normal temperature, esp. to room temperature:I took the steaks out of the freezer and thawed them.
  • to make less cold, formal, or reserved.
  • to make less tense or hostile.

  • n. 
  • the act or process of thawing.
  • the act or fact of becoming less formal, reserved, or aloof.
  • a reduction or easing in tension or hostility.
  • Meteorology(in winter or in areas where freezing weather is the norm) weather warm enough to melt ice and snow.
  • Meteorologya period of such weather:We had a two-week thaw in January.
  • Meteorologythe thaw, the first day in the year when ice in harbors, rivers, etc., breaks up or loosens enough to begin flowing to the sea, allowing navigation:The Anchorage thaw came on May 18th.
  • Etymology:bef. 1000;
    (verb, verbal) Middle English thawen, Old English thawian;
    cognate with Dutch dooien, Old Norse theyja;
    (noun, nominal) late Middle English, derivative of the verb, verbal
    thawless, adj. 
    1 . freeze.

    Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

    thaw /θɔː/ vb
    1. to melt or cause to melt from a solid frozen state: the snow thawed
    2. to become or cause to become unfrozen; defrost
    3. (intransitive) to be the case that the ice or snow is melting: it's thawing fast
    4. (intransitive) to become more sociable, relaxed, or friendly
    n
    1. the act or process of thawing
    2. a spell of relatively warm weather, causing snow or ice to melt
    3. an increase in relaxation or friendliness
    Etymology: Old English thawian; related to Old High German douwen to thaw, Old Norse theyja to thaw, Latin tabēre to waste away



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