WordReference can't find this exact phrase, but click on each word to see its meaning:

total encumbrance

ⓘ One or more forum threads is an exact match of your searched term. Click here.

We could not find the full phrase you were looking for.
The entry for "total" is displayed below.

Also see:encumbrance

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2016
to•tal /ˈtoʊtəl/USA pronunciation   adj., n., v.,  -taled, -tal•ing or (esp. Brit.) -talled, -tal•ling. 
adj. 
  1. of or relating to the whole amount of something;
    entire:[before a noun]the total expenditure.
  2. of or relating to the whole of something:[usually: before a noun]the total effect of the play on its audience.
  3. complete in extent or degree;
    utter:[usually: before a noun]a total failure.

n. 
  1. Mathematics the total amount;
    sum:[countable]That brings the cost to a total of $50,000.
  2. the whole:[uncountable;  in + ~]There were several thousand people there in total.

v. 
  1. Mathematics to bring to a total;
    add up:[+ object]He totaled the three columns.
  2. to reach a total of;
    amount to: [+ object;  no passive]The money totaled over fifty thousand dollars in cash.[+ to + object]The money totaled to over fifty thousand dollars.
  3. Slang Terms to wreck beyond repair:[+ object]He totaled his car in the accident.
to•tal•ly, adv. : You're totally crazy to think that.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2016
to•tal  (tōtl),USA pronunciation adj., n., v.,  -taled, -tal•ing or (esp. Brit.) -talled, -tal•ling. 
adj. 
  1. constituting or comprising the whole;
    entire;
    whole:the total expenditure.
  2. of or pertaining to the whole of something:the total effect of a play.
  3. complete in extent or degree;
    absolute;
    unqualified;
    utter:a total failure.
  4. involving all aspects, elements, participants, resources, etc.;
    unqualified;
    all-out:total war.

n. 
  1. the total amount;
    sum;
    aggregate:a total of $200.
  2. the whole;
    an entirety:the impressive total of Mozart's achievement.

v.t. 
  1. to bring to a total;
    add up.
  2. to reach a total of;
    amount to.
  3. [Slang]. to wreck or demolish completely:He totaled his new car in the accident.

v.i. 
  1. to amount (often fol. by to).
  • Medieval Latin tōtālis, equivalent. to Latin tōt(us) entire + -ālis -al1
  • Middle English (adjective, adjectival) 1350–1400
    • 1.See corresponding entry in Unabridged complete.
    • 5, 6.See corresponding entry in Unabridged gross, totality.
    • 6.See corresponding entry in Unabridged See whole.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

total /ˈtəʊtəl/ n
  1. the whole, esp regarded as the complete sum of a number of parts
adj
  1. complete; absolute
  2. (prenominal) being or related to a total: the total number of passengers
vb ( -tals, -talling, -talled) ( US -tals, -taling, -taled)
  1. when intr, sometimes followed by to: to amount: to total six pounds
  2. (transitive) to add up
Etymology: 14th Century: from Old French, from Medieval Latin tōtālis, from Latin tōtus all

ˈtotally adv



Advertisements

Word of the day: Intermediate+ crank

Advertisements
Report an inappropriate ad.