worth

SpeakerListen:
 /w3ːθ/



WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2016
worth1 /wɝθ/USA pronunciation   prep. 
  1. good or important enough to justify:That place is definitely worth visiting.
  2. having a value of:That vase is worth 20 dollars.
  3. having property to the value of:They are worth millions.

n. [uncountable]
  1. excellence, as of character; merit:a man of worth.
  2. usefulness or importance, as to the world, to a person, or for a purpose:Your worth to the team is unquestionable.
  3. value, as in money.
  4. a quantity of something of a specified value:The storekeeper gave him 50 cents' worth of candy.
  5. property or possessions; wealth.
idiom
  1. Idiomsfor all one is worth, to the utmost:She ran for all she was worth.

worth is an adjective and a noun, worthwhile and worthy are adjectives:The book is worth fifty dollars. He is of no worth. It was worthwhile work. I am not worthy of your love.
WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2016
worth1  (wûrth), 
prep. 
  1. good or important enough to justify (what is specified):advice worth taking; a place worth visiting.
  2. having a value of, or equal in value to, as in money:This vase is worth 12 dollars.
  3. having property to the value or amount of:They are worth millions.

n. 
  1. excellence of character or quality as commanding esteem:women of worth.
  2. usefulness or importance, as to the world, to a person, or for a purpose:Your worth to the world is inestimable.
  3. value, as in money.
  4. a quantity of something of a specified value:ten cents' worth of candy.
  5. wealth; riches;
    property or possessions:net worth.
  6. for all one is worth, [Informal.]to the utmost:He ran for all he was worth.
Etymology:bef. 900;
Middle English;
Old English weorth, wurth;
cognate with Old High German werd (German wert), Old Norse verthr, Gothic wairths
4. See merit. 6. See value. 
worth2  (wûrth), 
v.i. [Archaic.]
  1. to happen or betide:woe worth the day.
Etymology:bef. 900;
Middle English worthen, Old English wurthan, weorthan;
cognate with German werden, Old Norse vertha, Gothic wairthan to become, Latin vertere to turn (see verse)

Worth  (wûrth), 
n. 
  1. Place Namesa town in NE Illinois. 11,592.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

worth /wɜːθ/ adj (governing a noun with prepositional force)
  1. worthy of; meriting or justifying: it's not worth discussing, an idea worth some thought
  2. having a value of: the book is worth 30 pounds
  3. for all one is worthto the utmost; to the full extent of one's powers or ability
  4. worth one's weight in goldextremely helpful, kind, etc
n
  1. high quality; excellence
  2. value, price
  3. the amount or quantity of something of a specified value: five pounds worth of petrol
Etymology: Old English weorth; related to Old Saxon, Old High German werth (German Wert), Old Norse verthr, Gothic wairths



Worth /wɜːθ; French: vɔrt/ n
  1. Charles Frederick. 1825–95, English couturier, who founded Parisian haute couture



'worth' also found in these entries:
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