case

Listen:
 [ˈkeɪs]


WordReference Collins English Usage © 2019
case
‘in case’
You use in case or just in case to say that someone has something or does something because a particular thing might happen.
I've got the key in case we want to go inside.
We tend not to go too far from the office, just in case there should be a bomb scare that would prevent us getting back.
Be careful
After in case or just in case, you use a simple tense or should. You do not use ‘will’ or ‘shall’.
Be careful
You do not use ‘in case’ or ‘just in case’ to say that something will happen as a result of something else happening. You do not say, for example, ‘I will go in case he asks me’. You say ‘I will go if he asks me’.
He qualifies this year if he gets through his exams.
‘in that case’
You say in that case or in which case to refer to a situation which has just been mentioned and to introduce a statement or suggestion that is a consequence of it.
‘The bar is closed,’ the waiter said. ‘In that case,’ McFee said, ‘allow me to invite you back to my flat for a drink.’
I greatly enjoy these meetings unless I have to make a speech, in which case I'm in a state of dreadful anxiety.
‘in this respect’
You do not use ‘in this case’ to refer to a particular aspect of something. For example, you do not say ‘Most of my friends lost their jobs, but I was very lucky in this case’. You say ‘Most of my friends lost their jobs, but I was very lucky in this respect’.
The children are not unintelligent - in fact, they seem quite normal in this respect.
But most of all, there is that intangible thing, the value of the brand. In this respect, Manchester United, the most famous football club in the world, is unique.
'case' also found in these entries:
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