front

Listen:
 [ˈfrʌnt]


WordReference Collins English Usage © 2019
front
‘front’
The front of a building is the part that faces the street or that has the building's main entrance.
There is a large garden at the front of the house.
I knocked on the front door.
‘in front of’
If you are between the front of a building and the street, you say that you are in front of the building.
A crowd had assembled in front of the court.
People were waiting in front of the art gallery.
Be careful
Don't use ‘the’ before front in sentences like these. Don't say, for example, ‘People were waiting in the front of the art gallery’.
‘opposite’
If there is a street between you and the front of a building, don't say that you are ‘in front of’ the building. You say that you are opposite it.
The hotel is opposite a railway station.
Opposite is St Paul's Church.
There was a banner on the building opposite.
Speakers of American English usually say across from rather than ‘opposite’.
Stinson has rented a home across from his parents.
'front' also found in these entries:
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