cycling

Listen:
 [ˈsaɪkəlɪŋ]


For the verb: "to cycle"

Present Participle: cycling

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
cy•cling  (sīkling),USA pronunciation n. 
  1. the act or sport of riding or traveling by bicycle, motorcycle, etc.
  2. SportAlso called  bicycle race, bicycle racing. a race on lightweight bicycles with low handlebars, conducted for specified distances or against time on a dirt or board track or over public roads between cities.
  • cycle + -ing1 1935–40

WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
cy•cle /ˈsaɪkəl/USA pronunciation   n., v.,  -cled, -cling. 
n. [countable]
  1. any complete round or repeating series of events:the cycle of the four seasons.
  2. a recurring period of time, esp. one in which certain events repeat themselves:a cycle of no more than 50 seconds.
  3. Transporta bicycle, motorcycle, tricycle, or the like.
  4. Literature, Music and Dancea group of poems, songs, etc., about a central theme or figure:the Arthurian cycle.

v. [no object]
  1. to ride or travel by bicycle, motorcycle, or the like:They cycled into town for groceries.
See -cycle-.
-cycle-, root. 
  1. -cycle- comes from Greek, where it has the meaning "cycle;
    circle;
    wheel.'' This meaning is found in such words as: bicycle, cycle, cyclo, cyclone, cyclotron, recycle, tricycle.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
cy•cle  (sīkəl),USA pronunciation n., v.,  -cled, -cling. 
n. 
  1. any complete round or series of occurrences that repeats or is repeated.
  2. a round of years or a recurring period of time, esp. one in which certain events or phenomena repeat themselves in the same order and at the same intervals.
  3. any long period of years;
    age.
  4. Transporta bicycle, motorcycle, tricycle, etc.
  5. Literaturea group of poems, dramas, prose narratives, songs etc., about a central theme, figure, or the like:the Arthurian cycle.
  6. Physics
    • a sequence of changing states that, upon completion, produces a final state identical to the original one.
    • one of a succession of periodically recurring events.
    • a complete alteration in which a phenomenon attains a maximum and minimum value, returning to a final value equal to the original one.
  7. Mathematicsa permutation of a set of elements that leaves the original cyclic order of the elements unchanged.
  8. Computing
    • the smallest interval of time required to complete an operation in a computer.
    • a series of computer operations repeated as a unit.
  9. Idioms, Sporthit for the cycle, [Baseball.](of one player) to hit a single, double, triple, and home run in one game.

v.i. 
  1. to ride or travel by bicycle, motorcycle, tricycle, etc.
  2. to move or revolve in cycles;
    pass through cycles.
  • Greek kýklos cycle, circle, wheel, ring, disk, orb; see wheel
  • Late Latin cyclus
  • Middle English cicle 1350–1400


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

cycle /ˈsaɪkəl/ n
  1. a recurring period of time in which certain events or phenomena occur and reach completion or repeat themselves in a regular sequence
  2. a completed series of events that follows or is followed by another series of similar events occurring in the same sequence
  3. the time taken or needed for one such series
  4. a vast period of time; age; aeon
  5. a group of poems or prose narratives forming a continuous story about a central figure or event: the Arthurian cycle
  6. short for bicycle, motorcycle
  7. a recurrent series of events or processes in plants and animals: a life cycle, a growth cycle, a metabolic cycle
  8. one of a series of repeated changes in the magnitude of a periodically varying quantity, such as current or voltage
vb
  1. (transitive) to process through a cycle or system
  2. (intransitive) to move in or pass through cycles
  3. to travel by or ride a bicycle or tricycle
Etymology: 14th Century: from Late Latin cyclus, from Greek kuklos cycle, circle, ring, wheel; see wheel



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