WordReference Random House Learner's Dictionary of American English © 2019
pac•i•fy /ˈpæsəˌfaɪ/USA pronunciation   v. [+ object], -fied, -fy•ing. 
  1. to bring or restore to a state of peace:The babysitter tried to pacify the screaming child.
  2. to bring to a state of order, often by force; subdue:The army was ordered to pacify the surrounding area.
pac•i•fi•ca•tion /ˌpæsəfɪˈkeɪʃən/USA pronunciation  n. [uncountable]See -pac-.

WordReference Random House Unabridged Dictionary of American English © 2019
pac•i•fy  (pasə fī′),USA pronunciation  v.t.,  -fied, -fy•ing. 
  1. to bring or restore to a state of peace or tranquillity;
    quiet;
    calm: to pacify an angry man.
  2. to appease: to pacify one's appetite.
  3. to reduce to a state of submission, esp. by military force;
    subdue.
paci•fi′a•ble, adj. 
paci•fy′ing•ly, adv. 
  • Latin pācificāre to make peace. See pacific, -fy
  • late Middle English 1425–75
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged soothe, mollify, assuage.
    • 2.See corresponding entry in Unabridged anger, enrage.


Collins Concise English Dictionary © HarperCollins Publishers::

pacify /ˈpæsɪˌfaɪ/ vb ( -fies, -fying, -fied)(transitive)
  1. to calm the anger or agitation of; mollify
  2. to restore to peace or order, esp by the threat or use of force
Etymology: 15th Century: from Old French pacifier; see pacific

ˈpaciˌfiable adj



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